Uchumi Supermarkets Limited (UCHM.ug) 2005 Annual Report

first_imgUchumi Supermarkets Limited (UCHM.ug) listed on the Uganda Securities Exchange under the Retail sector has released it’s 2005 annual report.For more information about Uchumi Supermarkets Limited (UCHM.ug) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Uchumi Supermarkets Limited (UCHM.ug) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Uchumi Supermarkets Limited (UCHM.ug)  2005 annual report.Company ProfileUchumi Supermarket Limited is the oldest retail supermarket chain in Kenya selling fresh produce and quality merchandise, with an extended footprint in Tanzania and Uganda. The company has retail outlets in Nairobi, Meru, Eldoret, Kericho, Mombasa and Kisumi; ranging from hyper branches to express convenience stores. Uchumi Supermarket is primarily known for stocking fresh fruit and vegetables, breads and pastries and a range of local merchandise. Subsidiaries include Uchumi Supermarkets (Uganda) Limited and Uchumi Supermarkets (Tanzania) Limited. Kasarani Mall Limited is a subsidiary company engaged in property management. Uchumi Supermarket Limited is listed on the Uganda Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Zambian Breweries Plc HY2016 Presentation

first_imgZambian Breweries Plc (ZAMBRW.zm) listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange under the Beverages sector has released it’s 2016 presentation results for the half year.For more information about Zambian Breweries Plc (ZAMBRW.zm) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Zambian Breweries Plc (ZAMBRW.zm) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Zambian Breweries Plc (ZAMBRW.zm)  2016 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileZambian Breweries Plc (Zambrew) is a brewing and beverages company; producing and marketing a wide range of clear beers and soft drinks. The company has a virtual monopoly on clear brew products in Zambia, with popular South African brands in its product range such as Castle Lager, Redd’s, Castle Lite, Carling Black Label and Ohlsson’s Lager. The company also produces strong, local brands to cater for local tastes which are marketed under the Mosi Lager and Eagle Lager brand name. The Soft Drinks division produces well-known international brands, including Coca-Cola, Sprite, Fanta and Schweppes. The company has two breweries and three bottling plants in Zambia. SABMiller has a majority stake in Zambrew (87%). SABMiller is one of the world’s largest brewers, with more 200 beer brands in its international product portfolio. Zambian Breweries Plc is listed on the Lusaka Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Curry: ‘Jesus doesn’t allow us the option of self-righteousness’

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By André ForgetPosted Jul 11, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Same-Sex Blessings, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, July 11, 2016 at 6:46 pm If only the nation could hear these words….! Thank you, Bishop. Lois Bauby says: Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Emily Chatfield-Lusto says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Curry: ‘Jesus doesn’t allow us the option of self-righteousness’ Presiding bishop sits for interview with Canadian Anglican Journal Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY July 11, 2016 at 9:58 pm For some time now I have been depressed that I didn’t find the Episcopal Church sooner in my life. I realize that sounds weird but truly I see the vision and the work to be done and sometimes I feel I am just too old to do the work. But I have begun to know that I was called at this time at this place in my life. I have had ideas about the vision of the church and what it means for me and to me. I grew up Southern Baptist and at the ripe old age of 18 had studied the Bible a good bit and left the Baptist church because my life took me into places where I met gay people and I knew the Baptist church just didn’t have it right. My husband was Presbyterian and so we raised our family as members of that church. As an adult, my daughter joined the Episcopal church and I was there when she joined then the baptism of my grandsons brought me back and when I witnessed the promise of every member of that congregation say they would love my grandsons and they meant it, I came to this place, this church, this movement. I love these people beyond anything I can even express. They aren’t like me, their life experiences aren’t the same as mine and it doesn’t matter at all because they just aren’t there to judge me and they have taught me that we can disagree on a whole list of things and still love one another. I thank God everyday that this church exists. I thank God for Bishop Curry and his wise and thoughtful answers and questions. Bishop Diane, Father John, Father Con have all been a blessing to my life. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rev. Deacon Kay Swindell says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Same-Sex Marriage Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem July 11, 2016 at 8:19 pm Excellent interview. Thank you Bishop Curry for your heartfelt and divine responses. Truly we are not called to be like other Christians; we are called to be like Christ. Love God and your neighbours. Go and do likewise. I am thankful for His mercy, miracles and grace in my life. Peace of Christ be with you always. You are loved. Most Sincerely, Kathy McClure Member of Episcopal Community and St. A drews Episcopal Church PC, FL. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Kathy McClure says: Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry says the recent violence in America has left him with a “deep sadness.” But, he adds, “we’ve got work to do.” Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal] The first African-American to hold the position, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has been active in anti-racism and social justice work throughout his ministry, which began when he was ordained a priest in 1978 and continued with his consecration as bishop of North Carolina in 2000.Elected presiding bishop in 2015, Curry was installed in the months following the church’s ground-breaking decision to allow same-sex marriage, and it fell to him to navigate the fallout of that decision at the meeting of the primates of the Anglican Communion in January 2016.A passionate and charismatic orator, since his installation Curry has frequently challenged the church to see itself not as an institution, but as the “Jesus Movement.”The Anglican Journal sat down with Curry at the Anglican Church of Canada’s 41st General Synod, where he was an invited guest.In the one year since you were elected, and the eight months since you formally took office, what have you learned about being presiding bishop?I learned early on…that every position I’ve had in the church has really been different. I was a [parish] priest for 25, 26 years… I was the diocesan bishop for 15 years. As a parish priest, I saw my congregation every week.. I had constant, regular contact, and so there was a depth of relationship that evolved in my parishes.As a bishop diocesan, I had to stop and ask: Who is my congregation?..I had a congregation that was dispersed…The same work was being done in terms of sharing the gospel of Jesus and trying to help the community and body in the real way of discipleship and actually living in the world and making a difference, but it was a different calling…to be an instrument of the gospel, of personally being a follower of Jesus…But also of really trying to help the church to become a community that really does reflect the life of Jesus Christ in everything we do.Now I have to do that in a variety of…ways. Social media…help[s]. I made use of social media a lot when I was a diocesan bishop, and we are working on how to do that even more as a presiding bishop.How so?When I was a bishop diocesan, I used to post every Sunday. I’d post on Facebook and sometimes I would tweet it out, a picture of the congregation where I had been visiting, the confirmation class, or whatever it was they did…It was a…way of helping connect the diocese. People in the diocese, in the large cities, were actually getting to see churches and people in small and rural communities, and vice versa.. it was a way of connecting the body of Christ.So now, [the challenge is] figuring out how do you do that on a much larger scale…The Episcopal Church is all over the place. We’re in 16 countries now, very much multi-lingual.Social media is the new Roman highway and postal system, and we’re all…learning how can this be a new vehicle for the gospel, to spread the good news of Jesus.America right now is deeply divided…the rhetoric is hotter than it has been. Do you think the church has a role in building bridges between people? The church—followers of Jesus—are in the bridge-building business by being followers of Jesus. God built a bridge between divinity and humanity in Jesus.Reconciliation isn’t just singing Kumbaya and everyone being nice. Reconciliation is about the hard work of working through our differences, maybe acknowledging them and not changing them, necessarily. Working through our differences honestly and with integrity, and sometimes repenting of where our differences or my differences or yours has actually hurt relationship and not helped the human family.And there are a lot of times when that reconciliation requires repentance before it can happen, and maybe its repentance by most of us…The Jesus way is not to always have the answer, but to have a way to get to that answer. And sometimes that means I hold the perspective that I hold as my best approximation of my understanding of where God might be leading us…It is equally important for me to stand there and be clear about where I am, and to honour respect and cherish you as my brother, and to respect and honour the position that might be different than mine.It seems to me that the following of the Jesus way is to be able to be clear and yet humble at the same time, and yet equally clear that there must be room and space for you, because you may have a dimension of understanding that I don’t have, and to be honest enough to say, “I could be wrong, you could be right, or there could be something in between us.” I mean, the point is that none of us is God. That’s the real point, and if you’re in the reconciliation business, then we all kind of got to ‘fess up, “OK, I’m not God, but I’ve got a perspective, and I pray it’s godly.”In North Carolina, where I was the bishop…a few years ago now, the state legislature enacted various pieces of legislation that had dramatically negative and harmful effects on the poor. And there was a whole lot to it.. everything from various forms of voter suppression, rejecting Medicaid supplements which helped provide health insurance for people who wouldn’t get it otherwise, rejecting what was referred to as Obamacare—rejected the funding. Just all sorts of things that were going to hurt the most vulnerable among us, and a number of us had to say something, had to try to work with the legislature to do that.In some of the writings that I did together with our other Episcopal bishops, and ecumenically in responding to this, we were very clear that we were working on the principle—and none of us have all the answers—but the principle we used there was the principle of Jesus in the Sermon on the mount, Where Matthew says, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”That’s not just a cute little saying—that is a statement of how we do policy.A few weeks ago, someone asked me the same kind of question. I said, “You know what, Jesus gave us a clear, unadulterated unambiguous commandment: ‘Love God, and love your neighbour.’ ” Now, a whole lot of stuff in the Scripture you can debate, but that is not debatable. So when you vote, I’m not going tell anybody how to vote—you’ve got to figure that out, that’s between you, God and your conscience. Y’all got to wrestle with that, and that’s a principle that we’ve all got to honour, and I think that’s important.I’ve found over the years that that particular principle has helped me to really ask the hard question: does this look like love of neighbour? Does this really promote the greatest good for the greatest number? Does this really promote a culture and a society that really does love each other?Jesus doesn’t allow us the option of self-righteousness, whether we’re on the right or the left, because if you get self-righteous, it’s all about you and it ain’t got nothing to do with God.The Episcopal Church—like the Anglican Church of Canada—has a long history of being on the side of power. Do you think the church will need to change in order to meet that Jesus Movement vision?In the U.S., people used to say that the United States is a Christian nation. It’s not true anymore. I don’t know if it was really true when they used to say it. And that’s certainly true in the Western world, where Christianity is not the only religious tradition that people practice.So there’s a sense in which there’s a detachment, I think, of Christianity or the Christian religion from governmental structures, but also [from] the cultural and social structures. I think it’s fair to say that we do live in a post-Christian era, and I do not bemoan that, actually.My maternal grandparents hail from North Carolina, and even when I was a little boy and we would visit there…There’s a joke that everybody in the South is basically a Baptist, really—you may be a Methodist Baptist or a Catholic Baptist or an Episcopal Baptist or a Jewish Baptist or a Muslim Baptist, but this is the cultural order. But everybody in the South even when I was a little kid pretended they were a Christian and went to church, for the most part.Today in North Carolina, where I was bishop for 15 years before I became presiding bishop, the social demography…the people of North Carolina has changed profoundly. Whereas it was once basically blacks and whites, it is now black, white, Latino, Filipino—you look at the religious landscape and it is all over the map.And in the South, as everywhere else, the fastest-growing religious population is those who claim no religious affiliation…I don’t bemoan that, because I think the detachment of the Christian religion from the culture in which we are living, the end of the age of Christendom, is an opportunity for the church of the Acts of the Apostles, the church of the New Testament. The earliest church that was closest to Jesus of Nazareth. The church at its earliest energy, at its core, that church can now emerge, unencrusted by the institutional arrangements that were part of the age of Christendom, and that’s an opportunity for some real religion. That’s what I’m talking about when I talk about the Jesus Movement.This was a movement before it ever became an institution. And I’m not putting institutions down—they can serve the movement. But the movement ain’t supposed to serve the institutions. Something’s wrong when that starts to happen. And I think we’re in a time where we’re going to find it is time to get real. The days of cultural Christianity are over, and thank God. Because now we get on with the work of really following Jesus, really being his disciples and the community of his disciples in the world, and I think we will find our soul.You know, the church of the Acts of the Apostles, they did pretty well. And I think we can do it again.In your address you talked about race and violence that seem to be so much a part of life in America right now. When things like this happen, what keeps you going?There is a deep sadness. There’s a deep sadness for such pain and horror to be inflicted on the children of God. Everybody is somebody’s child…It doesn’t matter whether they are black or white or whether they wear a blue or green uniform…When violence takes life, no matter who they are, there is somebody at home weeping. And there is something in all of us, even if we didn’t know them, that weeps inside. And probably trembles, like it says in the Bible, in the Apocalypse, when Jesus trembles at what seems to be coming upon the world.I’m not saying they are new, but we’re seeing [acts of violence] because of cell phones…there is more of an awareness. But I do think we are wrestling with a spiritual disease that has allowed spiritual violence that is within to now be expressed in physical violence that comes out… Changing laws isn’t enough. We have to change hearts…that can change the climate…and the spirit of a culture…that can be a negative harmful and hurtful speech…attitudes that are destructive of human relationships and human beings.That’s huge work.I have to admit the side of Michael Curry that moves beyond deep lament and doesn’t give up, because you can’t get rid of it, but there’s a side of me that says we’ve got work to do…I really do believe that Jesus Christ changes lives. If I didn’t believe it, I wouldn’t be here… Change of heart is very much what I think Jesus was getting at when he said to Nicodemus, “You must be born again to see the kingdom.”So the more I lament, the more I’m ready to go preach and go live and go help the church be the church and do our work.How should the Canadian church work through the aftermath of the marriage canon vote?Whatever you do, do it in the name of love…Whatever the specific legislative outcome, who knows what that is going to look like, but the way of loving—and I’m talking about God’s loving, not some secular idea—will lead us to the place we are all meant to be. I know that I find myself probably heading or closer to being in the right direction when I can say,”This is the best approximation of love that I can find at this moment.”Two of the things Jesus talked about in John 13-17, in his last discourse at the Last Supper, he talked about love over and over again. “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, that you love one another.” He didn’t say that you agree with one another. He didn’t even really say if you like one another, but that you love one another.And you know the other thing he talks about? The Spirit. He says, “There are many more things I could tell you, but you cannot handle them now, but when the Spirit of truth comes he will lead you into all truth.”“I will not leave you comfortless, but I will send my Holy Spirit upon you to lead you.”There is some intimate relationship between the love of God and the Spirit of God, and the Spirit of Jesus that can lead us into the deeper truths of God. I don’t know how that works, except I know that it does. And whether it is any of our churches or traditions, when we have complex decisions that we have got to make, when we do it in…the discipleship of the way of love, trusting and open to the Spirit to lead us and guide us, I believe we will find our way in time. It is sort of like the Shaker hymn: “We will turn, turn, turn”… eventually if the Spirit is leading, we will turn around right.Where do you see the relationship between TEC and Cuba going in the near future?In our last General Convention last year, the church in Cuba had a resolution inviting the General Convention of TEC to explore the possibility of reuniting. So our convention established a task force of really good folk who have both ties, understanding and experience of the church in the United States and the church in Cuba. That task force has just preliminarily started its work. And Bishop Griselda [Delgado del Carpio] and others from the church of Cuba will be in that conversation, as will some people from Canada…be in that conversation.That task force has been asked to really do the kind of real discernment that looks at all of what this could look like, how do we do this—we’ve been separated, not because any of us wanted it, but because of the politics of our nations. And so how do we do this, and what could this look like?But looking at not only the practical, how-to kind of questions, but what are the cultural questions that Cuba is looking at and addressing. We’ve been separated for 50 years, so there are cultural and societal questions…How do we navigate that and get to know each other again in some deeper ways?And then there is some deeper spiritual discernment that really does move in the direction of, well, none of us really knows for sure if we’ve done all the practical homework trying to understand all the nuts and bolts…Do we have a sense of that voice calling us to be reunited?…I have no idea what that is, but ultimately, what does God’s dream look like for the Episcopal Church of Cuba and The Episcopal Church.And if we love each other, trust the Spirit, do our homework and say our prayers, we’ll find our way.We really are in deep discernment. We’re not playing games. There are a lot of questions. It is hard work. Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Human Sexuality, Rector Washington, DC July 12, 2016 at 5:01 pm Thank you, Lois, for your story. Mine is much the same. Comments (4) last_img read more

Retired bishop of Quebec running for Canadian Parliament

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Retired bishop of Quebec running for Canadian Parliament Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dennis Drainville, former bishop of the Diocese of Quebec in the Anglican Church of Canada. Photo: Cynthia Dow/Anglican Journal[Anglican Journal] Dennis Drainville, retired bishop of the Diocese of Quebec, is re-entering politics by running for the Green Party of Canada in the Oct. 21 federal election.Drainville, who retired as bishop in 2017, announced June 5 he would be running for the Greens in the riding of Gaspésie-Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine, which covers a swath of the Gaspé Peninsula as well as the Magdalen Islands.Drainville, who served as a member of Bob Rae’s NDP government in Ontario from 1990 to 1993, says he’s been involved in politics in some capacity his entire life, so that returning to it feels second-nature to him. His decision to re-enter now, he says, was spurred by a realization that the coming vote will be “an election like no other,” because it will require momentous decisions to be made on how to deal with the twin threats of climate change and unethical government.Read the full article here. Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Tali FolkinsPosted Oct 21, 2019 Faith & Politics Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Setting the Record Straight on Waivers

first_img Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Setting-the-record-straight-wrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.All summer long, the ethanol and corn industry pushed hard for the EPA to stop granting small refiner waivers. This caused some tension between Indiana Corn and CountryMark, Indiana’s farmer owned refinery that was granted such a waiver. Now the record has been set straight.This summer Indiana corn farmers and CountryMark, a blender of ethanol for gasoline, found themselves at odds over the issue of Small Refiner Waivers. Now Geoff Cooper, CEO of the Renewable Fuels Association, says, in their efforts to pressure the EPA, there may have been some misconceptions created, “I think there is a misconception that the ethanol industry is against refinery exemptions altogether, that is not the case. If there are cases where waivers are warranted, grant them.”Matt Smorch, VP of CountryMark, the Indiana farmer owned refinery that blends ethanol, says the waivers are a valuable safety net for small refiners, “Having a safety net in the Renewable Fuels Standard when there is a hardship is important to small refiners like CountryMark.”Cooper told HAT the decision by the Trump administration to re-allocate any ethanol exempted by waivers starting in 2020 is good for the ethanol industry and the corn market. He is still critical, however, of waivers being granted to refineries owned by large and profitable oil companies, “There are companies like Exxon and Chevron that have gotten small refinery waivers, and I don’t think that is who the law was intended to help.”Smorch believes that, in the future increasing the octane level in gasoline, will be a better way to grow demand for ethanol, without having to rely on mandates.Smorch told HAT CountryMark is a supporter of ethanol and will continue to blend the corn product into their gasoline. CountryMark is an American-owned oil exploration, production, refining and marketing company. The company’s complete line of premium quality liquid fuels begins with light, sweet crude oil, which is refined to the highest specifications at the CountryMark refinery in Mt. Vernon, Indiana. Previous articleMore Optimism Surrounding USMCA PassageNext articleTrump Says Farmers Will Need ‘More Land’ and ‘Bigger Tractors’ After China Announcement Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Setting the Record Straight on Waivers SHARE By Gary Truitt – Oct 13, 2019 SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Setting the Record Straight on Waiverslast_img read more

Pasadena Courthouse Reopens Following One-Day Closure due to Safety Concerns

first_imgHome of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News Pasadena and most other Los Angeles Superior Court courthouses reopened Tuesday, after a one-day closure for safety concerns related to protests following the death of George Floyd as he was being arrested in Minneapolis.Late Sunday night President Judge Kevin C. Brazile ordered all courthouses closed Monday. The courthouses that reopened Tuesday, including Pasadena, are handling only “time-sensitive and essential functions,” according to a statement.“The Court plans to reopen its Clerk’s Office on June 15 with a revised service model that prioritizes telephonic and online services, and appointments to meet in person with court personnel, in order to achieve social distancing protocols,” the statement read. “Hearings will resume gradually beginning June 22. Face masks and/or facial coverings will be mandatory.” faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News HerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyKim To File For Divorce From Kanye West After 6 Years Of MarriageHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Ways To Power Yourself As A WomanHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Pasadena Courthouse Reopens Following One-Day Closure due to Safety Concerns By ARON BENDER Published on Tuesday, June 2, 2020 | 1:01 pm More Cool Stuff STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News center_img CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS 14 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribelast_img read more

Major protest against cuts to Community Employement Schemes

first_img Pinterest Major protest against cuts to Community Employement Schemes Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Newsx Adverts Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Twitter Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Previous articleMc Hugh seeks to raise awareness of Credit Review Office following ISME surveyNext articleLifford and Stranorlar ambulance staff to be amalgamated News Highland center_img SIPTU is holding a protest meeting in Jackson’s Hotel, Ballybofey tomorrow morning against proposed Budget cuts to Community Employment Schemes.The protest meeting is being supported by a range of organisations including INOU, ICTU Community Committee, Congress Centre Network and Mental Health Ireland.They say the future viability of hundreds of Community Employment schemes across Donegal and the country employing tens of thousands of people is now in doubt.The government announced a 66% cut in funding as part of Budget 2012.SIPTU’s Martin O’Rourke has been outlining how he feels it will effects services in Donegal:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/siptu1pmbudget.mp3[/podcast] LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton By News Highland – December 12, 2011 Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Google+ Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more

County Board reportedly told to offer 5 euro tickey levy refund

first_img By News Highland – December 6, 2012 It is reported that the Donegal County Board could face a €60,000 bill after being ordered by the GAA’s management committee to offer a refund of a €5 levy imposed on tickets for this year’s All-Ireland football final.Croke Park took issue with the levy which increased the stand ticket price to €85.The Irish Independent reports that GAA management had earlier sought an explanation of the background to the levy, but were dissatisfied with the written response, leading to the chairman and secretary being summoned to HQ.According to management committee minutes seen by the newspaper, “the officers apologised for the inaccurate letter originally submitted and explained the circumstances surrounding the distribution of All-Ireland tickets.”They acknowledged that the €5 was a levy and gave assurances that there would be no repeat in future.Mayo were also asked by Croke Park to explain their All-Ireland deal, which offered clubs 20 extra tickets at an additional cost of €1,000.They successfully argued that this was in addition to clubs’ ordinary allocations and that it was not compulsory to avail of the deal.It’s expected that new guidelines will be issued to counties ahead of next year’s All-Ireland finals, detailing the limited circumstances in which ticket prices can be increased. Twitter News County Board reportedly told to offer 5 euro tickey levy refund Facebook Previous articleDonegal Deputy Pearse Doherty slams Budget 2013Next articleDungloe Hotel workers still awaiting wages News Highland WhatsApp LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Google+ Pinterestcenter_img Google+ Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad alsolast_img read more

Derry Science Park re-branded to encourage growth

first_img Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Previous articleGarda Inspector confirms 58 arrests during Rally weekendNext articleNew figures show IDA rarely brings companies on site visits to Donegal News Highland Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp The Northern Ireland Science Park has announced it’s changing its name to Catalyst Inc. as part of an expansion process that will see it develop another one million square feet of office space over the next 10 years with a possible 5,000 new jobs.The submission includes two new buildings at the North West Regional Science Park at Fort George in Derry,with the potential for up to 1,000 of those jobs.That’s been welcomed by Foyle MLA Mark H.Durkan, who says the plan will benefit Derry, Tyrone and Donegal:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/nmarkh1pmWEB.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry By News Highland – June 20, 2016 Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal center_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Facebook Derry Science Park re-branded to encourage growth RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Facebook Twitter Twitterlast_img read more

Beware! Even Private Obscene Messages Online Could Land One In Jail : Know About IT Act Offences

first_imgKnow the LawBeware! Even Private Obscene Messages Online Could Land One In Jail : Know About IT Act Offences Tanima Kishore & Anuj Kapoor12 May 2020 11:52 PMShare This – xA recently exposed Instagram group by the name of ‘Bois Locker Room’ has taken social media by storm. The private group on Instagram reportedly consisted of several teenage boys from schools in Delhi-NCR region. It is stated that the group was being used to share photos of minor girls and young women, after which group member(s) would engage in making lewd & derogatory…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA recently exposed Instagram group by the name of ‘Bois Locker Room’ has taken social media by storm. The private group on Instagram reportedly consisted of several teenage boys from schools in Delhi-NCR region. It is stated that the group was being used to share photos of minor girls and young women, after which group member(s) would engage in making lewd & derogatory comments about the girls/women depicted in the pictures so shared. Mostly, the group and the exchange of messages in it has been condemned for its toxic nature, as also for normalizing the sexual objectification of women. An FIR has already been registered by the Delhi Police for commission of offences under both the Indian Penal Code, 1860 (hereafter the IPC) as well as the Information Technology Act, 2000 (hereafter the IT Act). This attribute of criminality, however, is being questioned on various grounds – it was, after all, a private group; the conversations were not accessible to the public; the images shared were per se not objectionable, and in all likelihood, they had been obtained by simply visiting the profile of the persons in question. Furthermore, there is no information about any physical harm being done to any girl or woman. Then what is the offence that is committed? Cases of this nature where certain kinds of private communications put the criminal law in motion have been rather infrequent till now. Being a new area of law, there are several questions that have not yet been considered by any court of law. Therefore, through this article we foray into identifying such legal issues by correlating them with the relevant provisions of penal law. Towards the end, we also raise some concerns about the criminalization of certain kinds of consensual private communications, merely because they take place over the internet. Is it an offence to share or post obscene content on an online platform, including through a private message? Yes, section 67 of the IT Act does indicate so. Its title states ‘punishment for publishing or transmitting obscene material in electronic form’. Though the provision does not use the word ‘obscene’, it expresses the offence in the same terms as the word ‘obscene’ is defined under section Section 292, IPC. The provision, thus, penalizes the publishing or transmitting (or causing to publish or transmit) any material in the electronic form which is lascivious, or it appeals to the prurient interest, or if its effect is such as to tend to deprave and corrupt persons who are likely, having regard to all relevant circumstances, to read, see or hear the matter contained or embodied in it. Given that this may be a subjective assessment, the courts have, over the years, attempted to provide some standards for interpreting these expressions. Initially, the courts in India were following the archaic Hicklin test, according to which a material that tended to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences and into whose hands the material may fall was obscene, regardless of its artistic or literary merit.[1] More recently, the Supreme Court has shifted to a ‘community standards test’, according to which a particular material would be obscene if it is suggestive of a depraved mind and it is designed to excite sexual passion in persons who are likely to see, hear or read it, as the case may be.[2] Is it punishable to share on the internet a picture or a video depicting a sexual act? What about a video or a picture depicting nudity? Yes, section 67A of the IT Act punishes the publishing or transmitting (or causing to publish or transmit) in the electronic form any material which contains ‘sexually explicit act or conduct’. The expressions ‘sexually explicit act’ or ‘sexually explicit conduct’ have not been defined. Till now, these expressions have not been the subject of any comprehensive judicial interpretation, except for some brief discussion by the Bombay High Court in a bail matter[3]. However, it can hardly be doubted that this section does intend to cover within its scope pornographic content which is graphic in its depiction of any sexual activity. As far as nudity is concerned, the Bombay High Court in Jaykumar Bhagwanrao approved the applicability of both sections 67 & 67A to a case concerning the sending of an image of an erect penis via electronic communication to the complainant. The Court reasoned that ‘sexually explicit activity’ under section 67A would necessarily be lascivious or of prurient interest; and furthermore, that it may even be a unilateral activity, and need not be only a bilateral activity. Therefore, even material depicting nudity can form the basis for the offence under sections 67 & 67A to be made out. However, there is no straight-jacket formula. A stand-alone picture or video which is dominant in its depiction of nudity would stand at a greater risk of meeting the requirements for the offences, as compared to the fleeting depiction of nudity in film where such a scene is not intended to titillate the viewer[4].Also Read : No Law To Make Whatsapp Group Admins Liable For Messages By Group MembersDoes the law distinguish in its treatment of publishing or transmitting of sexual content available on the internet content depicting adults and minors? Yes, while section 67A is a general provision targeted at material which contains sexually explicit act or conduct, section 67B is a special provision aimed at penalizing such material depicting children (i.e. persons below 18 years of age). Being so, section 67B is even wider in its coverage. It addition to penalizing the publishing or transmitting of material which depicts children engaged in sexually explicit act or conduct, it also punishes any person who: (i) creates text or digital images, collects, seeks, browses, downloads, advertises, promotes, exchanges or distributes material in any electronic form depicting children in obscene or indecent or sexually explicit; or (ii) cultivates, entices or induces children to online relationship with one or more children for and on sexually explicit act or in a manner that may offend a reasonable adult on the computer resource; or (iii) facilitates abusing children online, or (iv) records in any electronic form own abuse or that of others pertaining to sexually explicit act with children. Is it possible to commit any of these offences by transmitting or publishing only text which is sexually graphic or obscene? Yes, it is possible. The key word in this regard in all three provisions (i.e. sections 67, 67A & 67B) is ‘any material’. There is no indication in these provisions to conclude that for the offence in question to be made out, the material is required to be of any particular nature or type. In fact, section 67 explicitly speaks of the possibility of the matter contained or embodied in the material being capable of being read, seen or heard. Similarly, even sub-clause (b) of section 67B refers to creation of text as one of the ways by which material in electronic form can be used to depict children in obscene or indecent or sexually explicit manner. Thus, there appears to be no doubt that these sections could be applied even where the obscenity or sexually explicit act or conduct is contained only in text, devoid of any pictures or video. Are there any exceptions to the acts which are punishable under sections 67, 67A & 67B of the IT Act? Yes, the proviso to section 67B carves out exceptions to acts punishable under these three provisions. The proviso stipulates that if the publication of such content in electronic form is justified as being for the public good on the ground that it is in the interest of science, literature, art or learning or other objects of general concern; or if it is kept or used for bona fide heritage or religious purposes. For instance, images in electronic form of a naked body shown for a medical or educational purpose, or images of the sexually graphic sculptures at Khajuraho temples would fall under the scope of the exceptions. Is it still an offence if the recipient of an obscene or sexually explicit material on private chat has no objection to receiving such material? Yes, it would still be an offence. Criminal culpability under these sections is not precluded on the ground that the recipient does not object to such obscene or sexually explicit material. Notably, even the exceptions stipulated in the proviso to section 67B are limited to what may be justified for the public good. This means that technically, even a sexually explicit private conversation between two consenting adults could be labelled criminal, if the messages are sent in an electronic form. Can the same act be punishable under both the IT Act as well as the IPC? No. This question has already been answered by the Supreme Court in Sharat Babu Digumarti v. Govt. (NCT of Delhi).[5] The Court after considering section 81 of the IT Act – which stipulates the Act to have overriding effect notwithstanding any inconsistency with any other law – ruled that an act which is covered by the special provisions contained in the IT Act would get out of the net of the IPC. Thus, publishing or transmitting any material in the electronic form which is punishable under sections 67, 67A or 67B would exclude application of section 292, IPC. Is constant monitoring of someone’s social media profile punishable under law? This conduct is probably more common in today’s age of social media. A person may repeatedly visit and view the social media profile of another – depending upon the access allowed by the latter’s privacy settings. However, even this innocuous conduct may – at least textually speaking – come within the ambit of the offence of ‘stalking’ as defined in section 354-D, IPC. The section, inter alia, penalizes the monitoring of the use by a woman of the internet, email or any other form of electronic communication. The scope and ambit of this kind of ‘stalking’ has not been the subject of any precedent yet. Is the act of sharing a person’s pictures from their social media profile on a private group punishable under law? None of the provisions of the IT Act or the IPC seem to cover such instances. However, intellectual property law, as also the user agreements in specific cases with the relevant social media platforms, might have a bearing on the legal implications of such acts. Can a passive member in a group on social media be punished for his membership of the group, if such group is used to share obscene and/or sexually explicit material? Is seeking, browsing or downloading of such material also an offence? What about the criminal culpability of the group administrators of such groups? As far as sections 67 & 67A are concerned, the answer to all these questions is in the negative for the simple reason that these provisions only penalize the act of ‘publishing’ or ‘transmitting’ (‘or causing to publish or transmit’). A person who is a passive recipient, or a browser, or even a person who merely seeks and downloads such prohibited material is not fastened with any criminal liability. The possession in electronic form of material that is obscene or that depicts sexually explicit act or conduct of anyone has not been penalized under sections 67 & 67A. The answer in relation to section 67B is however, different. Being broader in its ambit, the section penalizes even seeking, browsing or downloading such material that depicts children in an obscene, indecent or sexually explicit manner. In this context, it is pertinent to note that each of the three provisions penalizes not only the activity of publishing or transmitting, but also ‘causing to publish or transmit’. Therefore, arguably even a person who instructs, coerces, incites, encourages or prompts another to publish or transmit material that is punishable may be committing an offence under these provisions. With respect to the criminal culpability of a group administrator for merely being so, it may be noted that under criminal law, unless specifically provided for, there cannot be any vicarious criminal culpability.[6] The Delhi High Court has already ruled against attaching any liability to a group admin in a civil suit for defamation.[7] Concluding observations and concerns From the above discussion, we notice that in the absence of authoritative judicial pronouncements, the scope of operation of sections 67, 67A and 67B of the IT Act is still unclear. This applies to section 354-D, IPC as well. Nonetheless, the enlarged scope of Section 67B appears to be justified since the offence deals with depiction of children. However, for sections 67 & 67A – a glaring aspect that emerges is that these provisions criminalize even what may be an obscene or sexually explicit conversation exchanged privately between two or more consenting adults. On the other hand, the law does not forbid persons from having an identical conversation, if it takes place without the involvement of any electronic medium. Notably, even the IPC in its creation of obscenity-offences (sections 292 to 294) does not impinge on conduct which is innately private; the field of operation of these offences is restricted to commercial exploitation of such obscene material. The absence of elements of consent and privacy from sections 67 & 67A of the IT Act also raises some other fundamental questions: Is such criminalization going overboard, by forbidding speech that is within an individual’s (and maybe even a group’s) realm of privacy?If none of the group members intend to make their conversations (containing obscene and/or sexually explicit material) public, but it is so done by a non-member, then is it justifiable to punish the group members?Do any legal implications follow if a person publishes on a public platform (electronic or otherwise) obscene and/or sexually explicit conversations exchanged between two or more persons, privately & consensually?Can the IT Act’s criminalization of certain kinds of private communications (in electronic form) be justified as a reasonable restriction under Article 19(2) of the Constitution in the interests of ‘decency’ and/or ‘morality’? Would the right to privacy and the other reasons which necessitated decriminalization of adult consensual homosexual acts, hold relevance in this discussion? The courts may get to engage with these questions in the litigation arising from the ‘Bois Locker Room’ controversy. We can only hope that the values of privacy and consent, would find their due place in the jurisprudence that so develops. (Both the authors are Advocates-on-Record at the Supreme Court of India. The authors may be reached at [email protected] & [email protected]) [1] Ranjit D. Udeshi v. State of Maharashtra, AIR 1965 SC 881. [2] Aveek Sarkar & Anr. v. State of West Bengal, (2014) 4 SCC 257 [3] Jaykumar Bhagwanrao Gore v. State of Maharashtra, 2017 SCC Online Bom 7283 [4] Bobby Art International and Others v. Om Pal Singh Hoon and Others, (1996) 4 SCC 1 [5] (2017) 2 SCC 18 [6] R. Kalyani v. Janak C. Mehta, (2009) 1 SCC 516 [7] Ashish Bhalla v. Suresh Chawdhry, 2016 SCC Online Del 6329 Next Storylast_img read more