Lions No 8 Taulupe Faletau on playing in the moment

first_imgFor Faletau, that’s “so important” – players need to complement each other’s skill-sets. “If you have two jacklers or even three, then they’re all trying to do the same thing. Then somebody else is likely not doing something. You can’t all run around as three back-rowers doing the same thing, you’ll get in each other’s way.”Faletau has played South Africa eight times and only won three. He hasn’t faced them since 2017 but is full of respect for the balance their back row has. He says Duane Vermeulen, Pieter-Steph du Toit and Siya Kolisi all seem to have a chemistry, adding that this means any trio facing them needs to be harmonising with each other.And while some may not sing about Kolisi’s play, a watchful Faletau adds: “Clearly he’s the captain and has the leadership qualities but as a carrier he can be nightmarish – he’s such a powerful bloke and he’s actually got very good footwork.”There is something lovably old-fashioned about a thoroughly modern athlete who admits he gets caught up in just playing.Faletau carries into London Irish (Inpho)The throwback of all throwbacks comes when Faletau talks about cheat meals, though. Harking back to childhood days, he conjures the image of a park bench in Pontypool, with him gleefully nailing kebabs with Billy and Mako Vunipola.He explains: “When we were kids back in Wales, all the dads used to come around the house to drink kava (a traditional Pacific Island drink). It wasn’t the biggest of houses so there’s not much for us to do but wander outside. We’d end up outside the kebab shop.“We were just trying to be funny as cars were driving past and after our kebab we’d just wander the streets of Pontypool at night until all the dads finished drinking kava! There was a patch of grass by the house. That’s where we’d play a bit of rugby and annoy the neighbours hitting the cars with the ball. They’d come out and bloody hell, they’d go nuts!”Here’s to finding your happy place, playing with abandon.This feature first appeared in the June 2021 issue of Rugby World. Taulupe Faletau on the attack for Wales (Inpho) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Lions No 8 Taulupe Faletau on playing in the momentIT’S HARD to articulate, Taulupe Faletau says of the overarching goal in rugby. It’s nothing as self-serious as attaining zen – come on – but you’ll get it.“There is something I want to achieve,” says the British & Irish Lions back-row of his game. It may stem from having spent his fair share of time on the sidelines. “It is a personal thing. Is it achievable? What I’m trying to say is… It’s a feeling. When I’m in a game, when I’m feeling good, that’s what I want to get to.“Basically I want it to be there whenever I play. You’ll get it in bits and bobs throughout a game, which is fine, but what I want to get to is being in that place throughout a game.”If we are honest, the perfect game is unattainable. It’s how you do in the pursuit of it that defines greatness. According to feted back-row buddy Justin Tipuric, Faletau’s best attribute is his dizzying search for improvement (though asked if this extends to life off the park, Faletau laughs of DIY, “Bloody hell, it’s a good job my missus isn’t here or she’d be straight on saying, ‘This guy’s useless around the house!’”).Warming up with Bath (Getty Images)However, you can understand why in amongst the work you can catch feelings of belonging. And that sensation can be intoxicating.You don’t always have to be in the exact spot you want either, to find it. Lately Faletau showed his incredible Test pedigree for Wales but at times this season with Bath, he’s shifted from No 8 so that a bang-in-form Zach Mercer can anchor the scrum.“It’s bit different,” Faletau says of shifts to six or the bench. “Obviously you want to play in the position you always play or that you’re known for. We actually just had this conversation at training – you can’t complain, with Zach’s form. You can’t ask to play there when someone is going so well.“So I’ve fitted in and it took me a couple of games to slot in there but I feel like me and him, as a combination at six and eight, has gone well. He has been on fire, as everybody can see now.”Here you come to realise that Faletau likes aiming the spotlight at others he feels are deserving. He doesn’t want a fuss.Take the example of Gareth Bale, his brother-in-law. These are two of Wales’ premier athletes but the back-rower assumes the footballer gets asked loads of questions, so doesn’t want to hassle him. Then there’s public speaking: he is a leader who can talk his way around the park, but the bells and whistles are a bit much. “Speaking in front of a group of people is probably my worst nightmare,” he says. An unburdened Faletau is the most dangerous version.Which leads interestingly to talk of balance. They’re looking for it in the back row at Bath, and appear to have found it in Wales. So as everyone plays Fantasy Rugby with their own Lions XVs, will we pay enough heed to the need for balance?center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Bath, Wales and Lions back-rower on balance, Boks and kebabslast_img read more

Deanes catedralicios: Barkley Thompson de Houston

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Deanes catedralicios: Barkley Thompson de Houston El nuevo deán de la iglesia catedral de Cristo en Houston regresa ‘a casa’ en Texas Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Carol E. BarnwellPosted Mar 19, 2013 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET El Muy Rdo. Barkley Thompson posa junto a los retratos de los deanes y rectores que lo precedieron en la iglesia catedral de Cristo de la Diócesis Episcopal de Texas. Foto de Luke Blount[Diócesis Episcopal de Texas] La iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ Church Cathedral] fue fundada en 1939 cuando Houston era la capital de la República de Texas. Fue la primera congregación religiosa de la ciudad y la única que se mantiene en su ubicación original. Entre sus miembros fundadores estaban el secretario de Justicia de la república, así como lo secretarios del Tesoro, de Estado y de la Armada, y los embajadores de Texas ante Estados Unidos y México.La iglesia de Cristo se convirtió en catedral de la Diócesis de Texas en 1949 durante la celebración de su centenario, y sirve como lugar de hospitalidad y de culto para todos los episcopales de la diócesis. Seis rectores de la iglesia de Cristo han sido electos obispos, entre ellos John Hines, que llegó a ser obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal. El Muy Rdo. Barkley S. Thompson comenzó su nuevo ministerio como el octavo deán de la catedral el 7 de febrero.Carol E. Barnwell: ¿Quién era la persona de fe en su familia y cómo usted aprendió y experimentó su fe mientras crecía?Barkley Thompson: Me doy por dichoso de haberme criado en un medio de fe. Los miembros de mi familia pertenecían a la Primera Iglesia Metodista Unida de Paragould, Arkansas, y de niño y de joven estuve en la iglesia siempre que la puerta se abría para servicios religiosos, reuniones de jóvenes, comidas comunitarias, etc. (Le debo la mayor parte de mi conocimiento de contenido bíblico a la escuela dominical metodista).Mis dos abuelas me dieron ejemplos de fe. Mi abuela paterna creía fervientemente en los ángeles. Mi abuela materna comenzó una tradición familiar, un Día de Navidad cuando yo era un niño pequeño, en la que nuestra familia representaba un nacimiento viviente. Todo el mundo tenía que participar. Nos vestíamos con sábanas viejas y retazos de toallas y trapos para hacer los papeles de la Sagrada Familia, el posadero y los [tres reyes] magos. Casi 40 años después esa tradición perdura en mi familia.CEB: ¿Cómo llegó a profundizar en su fe y a escoger el ministerio ordenado? ¿Qué circunstancias contribuyeron a su decisión?BT: He sentido el llamado de Dios desde la adolescencia. Recuerdo un momento, cuando tenía 12 o 13 años, de pie en el santuario penumbroso y vacío de la Primera Iglesia Metodista Unida en Paragould, en que le dije a Dios en alta voz que yo era suyo. Obviamente, yo no sabía en ese momento lo que eso exactamente significaba o cómo se desarrollaría, pero lo dije en serio y mi sentimiento era genuino. Me hice episcopal en la universidad (que fue un regreso a la madre Iglesia, ya que mi padre se había criado como episcopal), y la primera persona con quien hablé acerca de un llamado al sacerdocio fue el Rdo. Sam Portaro, que era entonces  el capellán episcopal en la Universidad de Chicago, donde yo cursaba mis estudios de postgrado. Sam me alentó mucho y siempre le estaré agradecido.CEB: ¿Dónde ha ejercido antes su ministerio, y qué lecciones específicas ha extraído de esas experiencias?BT: La primera congregación donde serví de vicario y luego de rector fue los Santos Apóstoles [Holy Apostles], una parroquia que recomenzaba en Memphis. En el transcurso de varios años, la congregación se había reducido a unos 40 miembros, y cuando me gradué del seminario el obispo me encomendó mudar el remanente de la parroquia al borde de un barrio suburbano carente de presencia episcopal. Adorábamos en la parroquia de la Escuela Secundaria de “San Jorge” [St. George’s High School], mientras la congregación crecía hasta sobrepasar los 400 miembros. Finalmente compramos un terreno y construimos una iglesia. Mi buen amigo, el Rdo. John Leach, atiende ahora Los Santos Apóstoles, y la parroquia sigue prosperando.Acabo de terminar una tenencia de cinco años y medio como rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s] en Roanoke, Virginia. San Juan es una congregación de 150 años, que dispone de recursos y está en el centro de una ciudad de lento desarrollo. En poco más de cinco años, pusimos en práctica formas de culto innovadoras y, al mismo tiempo, tradicionales, nuevos programas de formación cristiana, iniciativas sociales y de crecimiento de la comunidad cristiana.Habiendo servido en dos ambientes muy diferentes, he llegado a creer que la Iglesia Episcopal puede prosperar en cualquier contexto. También estoy convencido de que el mundo anhela tanto nuestra tradición litúrgica y sacramental como nuestra teología de hospitalidad y gracia.Espiritualmente, mi experiencia atendiendo parroquias me ha hecho recordar una y otra vez que orar es algo fundamental para los sacerdotes. Esto puede parecer obvio, pero en la multitud de actividades de una gran parroquia, resulta demasiado fácil que la oración sea la cosa de la que se prescinde en la agenda diaria del sacerdote. No puede permitirse que eso suceda. Sólo centrándose regularmente en Dios es que puede el sacerdote —rector o deán— pastorear a la congregación hacia ese mismo centro.De manera práctica, me hacen recordar una y otra vez en mi vocación que nunca vamos a saber los conflictos internos de aquellos a quienes conocemos. El feligrés cuya vida parece la más coherente con frecuencia es aquel que a duras penas depende de la fe. Acercarse a nuestros hermanos cristianos con un oído receptivo y un corazón abierto puede significar, bastante literalmente, la diferencia entre la vida y la muerte. La más pequeña ocasión de gracia puede ser la que cambie la vida de una persona en apuros.CEB: Sé que usted tiene raíces en la catedral. ¿De qué manera se refleja ese nexo en su decisión de aceptar un llamado como deán aquí?BT: Mi familia se remonta a varios de los  llamados “Viejos Trescientos” que fueron de Estados Unidos a Texas con Stephen F. Austin en los años veinte del siglo XIX. Mi bisabuelo se mudó de Bellville, Texas, a Houston, cuando era un joven profesional, y mi abuelo se crió en la iglesia catedral de Cristo. Yo crecí oyendo historias de antepasados que colonizaron la tierra, que hicieron de Texas su hogar y que lucharon por la independencia de Texas. Cuando estudiaba en el Seminario del Sudoeste en Austin, pude conectarme con mis raíces texanas. Mis padres me visitaron numerosas veces en Austin y hacíamos excursiones de un día al condado de Fayette (de donde son la mayoría de mis antepasados texanos) y a otras zonas. El sentir el llamado a la iglesia catedral de Cristo no se debe a la historia de mi familia,  pero vino a sumarse a todas las otras señales de que Dios estaba casando la catedral conmigo en un ministerio compartido. Mis raíces texanas me hacen percibir este traslado como una especie de regreso a casa.CEB: Houston es una ciudad increíblemente diversa, étnica y culturalmente. ¿Cómo responderán ustedes al desafío de llegar a ser una congregación más diversa?BT: Lo más importante, la configuración futura de la congregación de la catedral debe ser el resultado de una visión compartida que se vaya creando devotamente a lo largo del tiempo, en estrecha consulta con el liderazgo laico y con amplia contribución de la comunidad de la catedral. Para que eso tenga lugar, la catedral y el deán deben tener primero la oportunidad de desarrollar una confianza mutua. El crecimiento de cualquier clase —en diversidad, en número, en programas, etc. — conlleva necesariamente un cambio. Sólo a través de un proceso cuidadoso, leal y deliberado, el deán y la catedral podrán llevar adelante cualquier tipo de iniciativa con previsión, esperanza y alegría.Dicho eso, puedo dar unas cuantas ideas generales sobre la creciente diversidad congregacional. La diversidad congregacional puede referirse a la nacionalidad y la etnia, pero también a las diferencias generacionales y a los diferentes estratos socioeconómicos. Parte del porqué el cristianismo tradicional ha fracasado con tanta frecuencia en aumentar su diversidad es que las iglesias tienden a decidir en un vacío qué presuntos feligreses no representados quieren o necesitan y luego esperan que los no episcopales o lo que no tienen iglesia abracen lo que les ofrecemos. La clave consiste en escuchar primero las expresas esperanzas y necesidades de, por ejemplo, los que han hecho recientemente su hogar en el centro de Houston y que podrían estar en busca de una comunidad espiritual. Sólo entonces puede llegar a saber la catedral la mejor manera de responder de una forma que acoja a los recién llegados a nuestro medio.CEB: ¿Cómo imagina la vida de la catedral en el centro de Houston, en la Diócesis de Texas?BT: Reiteraré aquí lo que dije antes: cualquier visión específica sobre el papel de la catedral en el centro de Houston y en la Diócesis de Texas debe ser una visión compartida y devotamente creada a lo largo del tiempo por el deán, la comunidad de la catedral y (con respecto a la diócesis) el obispo. Con eso en mente, puedo ofrecer algunas ideas generales respecto a mi interpretación del ministerio urbano, céntrico, y del papel de la catedral como la iglesia central de la diócesis.En Roanoke, [la iglesia de] San Juan (que atendí en tiempo más reciente) se encuentra equidistante entre la Torre de Wells Fargo y el Hospital Memorial de Roanoke (un centro traumatológico de primer nivel), lo cual significa que la parroquia existe en el corazón mismo del centro comercial, bancario, gubernamental y de atención sanitaria de Virginia sudoccidental. Oír sonar las campanas de San Juan a cada hora, servía de recordatorio de que Dios reside no sólo en el culto dominical, sino también en medio de cada una de estas partes de nuestras vidas colectivas. Dios tiene algo que decir respecto a la manera en que hacemos negocios, de la manera en que tratamos a nuestros ciudadanos y de la manera en que atendemos a los que sufren. Dios nos reclama a todos nosotros, y, puesto que el Dios encarnado habita entre nosotros, toda la vida es santa. Las parroquias urbanas y céntricas como la iglesia catedral de Cristo tienen la responsabilidad de recordarle a la ciudad esta verdad, y esa responsabilidad es un desafío, una oportunidad y un privilegio.Debido a su papel y a su ubicación centrales, la catedral también sirve en Houston como una alternativa icónica a otras formas de cristianismo que son insulares y que con frecuencia se concentran en el bienestar individualista y material, más bien que en la redención de toda la comunidad como el cuerpo de Cristo. Podemos ser un lugar de acogida y refugio espirituales para todos los que entran por nuestras puertas buscando conocer más profundamente el amor de Dios.Adicionalmente, espero que la catedral sirva cada vez más como centro de formación, de adoración y de identidad cohesiva para todos los episcopales de la Diócesis de Texas, y espero colaborar con el obispo [C. Andrew] Doyle, en  la formulación de ideas para ver cómo esto podría llevarse a cabo. En la Iglesia Episcopal nos gusta decir que el componente fundamental de la Iglesia es la diócesis más que la parroquia, y en ese sentido la catedral pertenece a todos los episcopales de la diócesis (el deán [Joe] Reynolds se ocupó de enfatizar esto).CEB: ¿Cómo y dónde conoció a su esposa? ¿Cómo se refleja su vida de pareja en su ministerio?BT: Jill y yo nos conocimos en Hendrix College, una estupenda universidad especializada en humanidades de las afueras de Little Rock [Arkansas]. Vivíamos a pocas puertas en los apartamentos de la universidad. Jill es episcopal de cuna, proveniente de la catedral de la Trinidad en Little Rock, y puesto que yo me había pasado hacía poco de la Iglesia Metodista a la Episcopal, ¡resultó fácil enamorarme de una episcopal!Por una parte, Jill es mi piedra de toque, mi consejera y mi mejor amiga. Ella posibilita que yo sea un sacerdote fiel. Por otra parte, Jill se ha dedicado al ministerio de la Iglesia en sus propias áreas de pasión e interés. En años recientes, ha colaborado con el ministerio de los niños, y el año pasado codirigió el “Club 45” de San Juan-Roanoke, que es un grupo de preadolescentes de cuarto y quinto grados. En su vida profesional, Jill es fisioterapeuta. Eso y la maternidad son sus vocaciones.Carol E. Barnwell es directora de comunicaciones de la Diócesis Episcopal de Texas. Esta entrevista apareció primero en la edición de marzo de la publicación diocesana Diolog.— Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

A Word to the Church from the Episcopal Church’s House…

first_img Comments (8) Featured Events P.J. Cabbiness says: Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing September 27, 2017 at 10:44 am I will listen to the creator and not make an idol of his created work and I certainly will not heed the Marxist message as set forth above. Submit a Press Release [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Episcopal Church House of Bishops, meeting in Fairbanks, Alaska (Diocese of Alaska) approved and presented the following Word to the Church, in English and Spanish.A Word to the Church from The Episcopal Church’s House of BishopsGathered in Fairbanks, Alaska, September 21-26, 2017The bishops of The Episcopal Church came to Alaska to listen to the earth and its peoples as an act of prayer, solidarity and witness. We came because:• “The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it, the world, and those who live in it; for he has founded it on the seas, and established it on the rivers” (Psalm 24:1-2). God is the Lord of all the earth and of all people; we are one family, the family of God.• “You are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are … members of the household of God” (Ephesians 2:19). The residents of interior Alaska whom we met are not strangers; they are members of the same household of faith.• People have “become hard of hearing, and shut their eyes so that they won’t see with their eyes or hear with their ears or understand with their minds, and change their hearts and lives that I may heal them” (Matthew 13:14-15). We are blind and deaf to the groaning of the earth and its peoples; we are learning the art of prayerful listening.What does listening to the earth and its people mean? For us bishops, it meant:• Getting out and walking the land, standing beside the rivers, sitting beside people whose livelihood depends on that land. We had to slow down and live at the pace of the stories we heard. We had to trust that listening is prayer.• Recognizing that struggles for justice are connected. Racism, the economy, violence of every kind, and the environment are interrelated. We have seen this reality not only in the Arctic, but also at Standing Rock in the Dakotas, in the recent hurricanes, in Flint, Michigan, Charlottesville, Virginia, and in the violence perpetuated against people of color and vulnerable populations anywhere.• Understanding that listening is deeply connected to healing. In many healing stories in the gospels, Jesus asked, “What do you want me to do for you?” That is, he listened first and then acted.What did we hear?• “The weather is really different today,” one leader told us. “Now spring comes earlier, and fall lasts longer. This is threatening our lives because the permafrost is melting and destabilizing the rivers. We depend on the rivers.”• The land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge where the caribou birth their calves is called the “sacred place where life begins,” so sacred the Gwich’in People do not set foot there. “Drilling here,” people said, “is like digging beneath the National Cathedral.”• After shopping together, a native Episcopalian told one of us how hard it is to even secure food. “We can’t get good food here. We have to drive to Fairbanks. It is a two-hour trip each way.”What we bishops saw and heard in Alaska is dramatic, but it is not unique. Stories like these can be heard in each of the nations where The Episcopal Church is present. They can be heard in our own communities. We invite you to join us, your bishops, and those people already engaged in this work, in taking time to listen to people in your dioceses and neighborhoods. Look for the connections among race, violence of every kind, economic disparity, and the environment. Then, after reflecting in prayer and engaging with scripture, partner with people in common commitment to the healing of God’s world.God calls us to listen to each other with increased attention. It is only with unstopped ears and open eyes that our hearts and lives will be changed. It is through the reconciling love of God in Jesus and the power of the Holy Spirit that we and the earth itself will be healed.A Prayer for Our Time and for the EarthDear God, Creator of the earth, this sacred home we share;Give us new eyes to see the beauty all around and to protect the wonders of creation.Give us new arms to embrace the strangers among us and to know them as family.Give us new ears to hear and understand those who live off the landand to hear and understand those who extract its resources.Give us new hearts to recognize the brokenness in our communitiesand to heal the wounds we have inflicted.Give us new hands to serve the earth and its peopleand to shape beloved community.For you are the One who seeks the lost,binds our wounds and sets us free,and it is in the name of Jesus the Christ we pray.Amen.Resources are here.La Cámara de los Obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal, reunidos en Fairbanks, Alaska (Diócesis de Alaska) aprobó y presentó la siguiente Palabra a la Iglesia.Una Palabra a la Iglesia de la Cámara de los Obispos de la Iglesia EpiscopalReunida en Fairbanks, Alaska del 21 al 26 de septiembre de 2017Los obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal vinieron a Alaska para escuchar a la tierra y a sus gentes como un acto de oración, solidaridad y testimonio. Venimos porque:• ”La tierra es del Señor y todo lo que está en ella, el mundo, y los que viven en ella; porque él la fundó en los mares y la estableció en los ríos” (Salmo 24:1-2) Dios es el Señor de toda la tierra y de toda la gente; somos una familia, la familia de Dios.• “Ya no eres más desconocido o extranjero, porque eres… miembro de la familia de Dios” (Efesios 2:19). Los residentes del interior de Alaska a quienes conocimos no son desconocidos; ellos son miembros de la misma casa de fe.• Las personas “se han hecho duras y no escuchan y cierran sus ojos para no tener que ver con sus ojos o escuchar con sus oídos o entender con sus mentes y cambian sus corazones y vidas para que pueda sanarlos” (Mateo 13: 14-15). Estamos ciegos y sordos a los gemidos de la tierra y a sus gentes; estamos aprendiendo el arte de escuchar en oración.¿Qué significa escuchar a la tierra y a sus gentes? Para nosotros los obispos significa:• Salir y caminar en la tierra, pararse al lado de los ríos, sentarse junto a la gente cuyo sustento depende de esta tierra. Tuvimos que aflojar el paso y vivir al ritmo de las historias que oímos. Tuvimos que confiar en que escuchar es rezar.• Reconociendo que las luchas por la justicia están conectadas. El racismo, la economía, la violencia de todo tipo y el medio ambiente están interrelacionados. Hemos visto esta realidad no solo en el Ártico sino también en Standing Rock en las Dakotas, en los huracanes recientes, en Flint en Michigan, en Charlottesville en Virginia y en la violencia perpetuada contra las personas de color y las poblaciones más vulnerables en todos lados.• Entendiendo que escuchar está profundamente conectado a la sanación. En muchas historias de saneamiento en la biblia, Jesús preguntó, “¿Qué quieres que yo haga por ti?” Eso es, él escuchó primero y luego actuó.¿Qué escuchamos?• Un líder nos dijo “el clima es realmente distinto hoy”. “Ahora la primavera llega más pronto y el otoño dura más. Esto amenaza nuestras vidas porque el permafrost se está derritiendo y desestabilizando los ríos. Nosotros dependemos de los ríos”.• La tierra en el  Refugio Nacional Ártico de Vida Silvestre donde el caribú pare sus crías y se llama el “sitio sagrado donde la vida comienza”, es tan sagrado que el pueblo Gwich’in no pone un pie ahí. “Perforar aquí”, dijo la gente, “es como perforar debajo de la Catedral Nacional”.• Después de comprar juntos, un episcopal nativo le dijo a uno de nosotros lo difícil que es  conseguir alimentos. “No podemos conseguir buenos alimentos aquí. Tenemos que manejar hasta Fairbanks. Es un viaje de dos horas de ida y vuelta”.Lo que nosotros los obispos vimos y oímos en Alaska es dramático; pero no es único. Historias como estas pueden escucharse en cada una de las naciones donde se encuentra la Iglesia Episcopal. Pueden ser escuchadas en nuestras propias comunidades. Los invitamos a que se unan a nosotros, sus obispos, y a esas personas que ya están comprometidos con este trabajo, tomando tiempo para escuchar a las personas en sus diócesis y barrios. Busquen las conexiones entre la raza, la violencia de todo tipo, la disparidad económica y el medio ambiente. Luego después de reflexionar en oración y abordando las escrituras, asóciense con personas con el compromiso común de sanar el mundo de Dios.Dios nos llama a escucharnos unos a otros con mayor atención. Es solo con oídos destapados y ojos abiertos cuando nuestras vidas y corazones cambiarán. Es a través del amor reconciliador de Dios en Jesús y el poder del Espíritu Santo cuando nosotros y la tierra misma seremos sanados.Una Oración para Nuestros Tiempos y para la TierraQuerido Dios, Creador de la tierra, este hogar sagrado que compartimos;Danos ojos nuevos para ver la belleza que nos rodea y para proteger las maravillas de la creación.Danos brazos nuevos para abrazar a los desconocidos entre nosotros y para conocerlos como familia.Danos nuevos oídos para escuchar y entender a aquellos que viven de la tierray para oír y entender a aquellos que extraen sus recursos.Danos corazones nuevos para reconocer los quebrantamiento en nuestras comunidadesy para sanar las heridas que hemos causado.Danos nuevas manos para servir la tierra y sus gentesy para moldear nuestra querida comunidad.Porque eres el Único que busca a los perdidos,venda nuestras heridas y nos dejas libres,y en el nombre de Jesucristo oramos.Amén.Los recursos se encuentran aquí. October 27, 2017 at 10:05 am Thank you to the bishops for listening. For much of my life, I “pronounced” without listening. (Wrong.) I speak as one who lives in a part of British Columbia where the major road is called the Highway of Tear because of the number of missing and murdered indigenous women who lived along that road. To my shame I have never once visited even one of the surviving, grieving relatives. Needless to say, I never listened in person to their stories. Thank you, bishops–and those who paid their way through donations–for listening IN PERSON to our brothers and sisters. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY September 27, 2017 at 8:32 pm I think we need to be kind. The new numbers are out on church decline and they are desperately grasping at straws and trying to get us worked up about something that will make them look relevant. If we were in their position we would likely be doing the same thing. We need to hold them in love and in our prayers. Jawaharlal Prasad says: Doug Desper says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Kenneth Knapp says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Tags September 27, 2017 at 7:40 pm I don’t see the connection between the Alaska experience and other news events. Other than humans are involved. It seems like they just threw that other stuff in. The average Episcopal in the pew needs this missive translated from episcobabble into plain English. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Advocacy Peace & Justice, House of Bishops, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Christine Caines says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska September 29, 2017 at 8:21 pm I am a fifth generation resident of Cape Cod who was raised to appreciate the earth as God made it. In fact my great grandfather did not attend church when my great grandmother brought me and my sister on Sundays. Instead he went into the woods and prayed and sang hymns. He called it his “church of trees and water” (there was a stream nearby). Those same woods are now two shopping malls across from each other. So sometimes, when I’m home, I go to the beach to pray. The waves of the Atlantic which no one can take from me. Then, on a lark, I went parasailing. Oh, what joy, to be up in the blue sky..thankingGod. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Deborah M. Warner says: Rector Shreveport, LA Curt Gesch says: Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Environment & Climate Change, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted Sep 27, 2017 September 28, 2017 at 12:28 pm I am not sure if the “Word to the Church” is a Marxist message. In many countries, those in economic power have not respected the values espoused by tribal / indigenous / vulnerable people. If there was any it was only on paper meaning that any agreements made were rarely kept. Some churches provided the moral / ethical arguments needed by those in economic power to justify what they were doing. The arguments were often based on faulty reading of the Bible or scriptural writings. Even lands considered to be sacred by tribal / indigenous / vulnerable people were confiscated sometimes violently. Even those living on land for many centuries thru’ legal maneuvering are classified as illegals and denied privileges that are due to any citizen.God’s creation should be respected; resources extracted should be done so without causing undue damage to people and environment. It is time to heal and address issues that divide us to promote reconciliation and harmony. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY A Word to the Church from the Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops September 27, 2017 at 5:17 pm “…..in the violence perpetuated against people of color and vulnerable populations anywhere.”One could rephrase and leave this statement at simply “senseless violence and disregard for life”.Buried without much attention in the national news (VERY noticeably) is the weekend story of Emanuel Kidega Samson (formerly of Sudan) who attacked the Burnette Chapel Church of Christ in Antioch, Tennessee on Sunday. From reports the congregation is predominantly White/Anglo but other races and ethnic groups are frequent worshipers. Samson shot seven people while they were at church. Melanie Smith was the eighth victim and was shot in the head and then in her face wherein she later died from her wounds.We have heard our leaders announce resolve to challenge racism and prejudice by saying “Because of Ferguson we must ….”, “Because of Charleston we must….”, “Because of Charlottesville we must….”.However, Burnette Chapel will not have an activist campaign or slogan emerge from their tragedy. This is the blindspot of the current identity politics. That Burnette Chapel is not newsworthy is revealing. It doesn’t fit the media and activist narratives of “who and why”.Will anyone “go there” and strip the racial, ethnic, sociological, and philosophical quantifiers of worthiness while speaking about tragedy and injustice and simply say that “Because of Burnette Chapel we must reject hatred and disregard of life in all of its forms”? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Richard Basta says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI House of Bishops Fall 2017 September 29, 2017 at 1:14 pm I am deeply grateful for the faithful attention that the House of Bishops paid to the interconnection between environmental degradation, violence, racism and economic justicein their most recent Letter to the Church issued from Alaska this month. As they so eloquentlyexpressed, this interconnection shows the intricate intimacy of the created order.As people of faith, we are called to serve the whole creation as stewards of the earth, sky and seasas well as all life.Having attended the public sessions of the COP 21 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris 2015, and meeting indigenous people from across the globe, I was humbled by the stories and faithfulness of so many in settings that grow out living in the midst of rising seas and warming terrain.To read the Letter of the House of Bishops is to hear an intentional pastoral response to the most critical moral issue facing the entire planet. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

Fight for Sight to promote fundraising events via opticians

first_img  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 June 2004 | News Tagged with: Events Individual giving AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Blindness research charity Fight for Sight is sending out a new leaflet to almost 1,000 independent opticians in a bid to encourage individuals to take part in fundraising events.The leaflet offers details of parachute jumps, road races including the New York Marathon, whitewater rafting and other adventurous events.Corporate Fundraiser Jacqui Collins said: “We hope this leaflet will encourage more people to take part in these exciting fundraising challenges.” Advertisement Fight for Sight to promote fundraising events via opticianslast_img read more

Switchandgive increases online affinity payment for ChildLine

first_imgSwitchandgive also generate funds for other charities, although the standard donation per fuel changed is £10. Switchandgive increases online affinity payment for ChildLine About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  31 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Tagged with: Digital Research / statistics Howard Lake | 24 October 2004 | News Utility comparison site Switchandgive.com is increasing the amount it will donate to children’s charity ChildLine when customers switch energy suppliers via its Web site or phone service.Switchandgive have increased the amount to £18 to celebrate the children’s charity’s 18th birthday this month. Indeed, the site, set up by Fundraising Innovations Ltd, will pay £18 per fuel for every customer who switches to a cheaper energy supplier via their service.Mark Todd, director at switchandgive.com, commented: “We’re really pleased to be able to support ChildLine in this way. Switchandgive.com has already donated over £60,000 to charity, so hopefully we can donate a significant sum to ChildLine as it celebrates 18 years of supporting children with its counselling service.” Advertisementlast_img read more

2016 Social CEOs Awards open for nominations

first_img2016 Social CEOs Awards open for nominations  94 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11 This year’s Top 30 Charity CEOs on Social Media Awards have opened for nominations.Launched by digital marketing specialists Zoe Amar and Matt Collins from Platypus Digital, the awards are now in their fourth year. Previous award winners have included Peter Wanless from the NSPCC, to Jan Tregelles of Mencap and Ruth Hunt from Stonewall. Any leader of any registered charity, of any cause or size, based anywhere in the world, can be nominated.As well as voting for the top 30 CEOs, for the first time this year, the judges will also select an overall winner. There are also four awards to recognise individuals’ social media presences in the following categories:Best trusteeBest senior leader (director or equivalent i.e. head of)Best rising star (senior manager/manager level)Leader with the most innovative social media presence (CEO or director or equivalent level)Simon Blake, CEO of the NUS, has returned for the fourth year as Chair of the judging panel, joined by Peter Wanless, CEO of the NSPCC, Karl Wilding, director of public policy and volunteering, NCVO, Caron Bradshaw, CEO of CFG, Rohan Hewivasenti, group director of resources at RNIB, Beth Kanter, US-based social media specialist, Lucy Caldicott, charity leadership and governance specialist.This year’s awards will take place at JustGiving on the evening of Thursday 17th November.The four individual awards are sponsored by TPP Recruitment, and Grant Thomson providing additional sponsorship.Nominations must be made online by midnight on Friday 30 September.  93 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Tagged with: Awards social social media Melanie May | 14 September 2016 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11last_img read more

Purdue Ag Economists: Now is the Time to Act on 2019…

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Purdue Ag Economists: Now is the Time to Act on 2019 Crop Facebook Twitter Purdue Ag Economists: Now is the Time to Act on 2019 Crop By Eric Pfeiffer – Jun 16, 2020 Previous articleExports to China Not Meeting ExpectationsNext articleIndiana FFA Convention Opens to Large Crowds, Around Computers Eric Pfeiffer SHARE Purdue ag economists Jim Mintert and Michael Langemeier agree that now is the time to act on your 2019 crop you’re still holding onto.Mintert says, “So, this is that environment where we have a tendency, almost every year, to see some kind of a rally take place with respect to crop prices. I’m not going to say you should sell today but I think you should be looking very hard at whether not this is going to be the time for that rally.What timeframe should you be looking at to unload your old crop? As Mintert mentioned before, he wouldn’t say to move today, per se, “But from a longer-term perspective, this is the time when you want to be moving.”“So, whether you choose to move today, maybe wait a few days and see how the weather plays out, over the next week or two could be a good opportunity to move out those remaining old crop supplies and perhaps do some pricing on the new crop,” says Mintert.Langemeier agrees, especially as it relates to soybeans.“There’s quite a bit of risk as you hold those beans into July and August. So, I definitely think you should start to think about marketing some of those old crop soybeans soon. It’s very difficult, of course, to pick a day, or pick a week even, to do that, but just keep in mind that you’re going to have quite a bit of volatility, quite a bit of risk, associated with holding those beans any longer than about 2 to 4 weeks.”Mintert, the director of the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture, and Langemeier cohosted a webinar and podcast last week to discuss this, the recent WASDE report, and land values, among other things.You can find the webinar and podcast at this link. SHARE Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Planting Forecast: Windows for Drying Will Be Narrow

first_img By Ryan Martin – Apr 30, 2021 SHARE SHARE Planting Forecast: Windows for Drying Will Be Narrow Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Planting Forecast: Windows for Drying Will Be Narrow Planting progress may be difficult to attain in this next week. We do not have any significant windows of good drying for the period starting Monday and going through next weekend. In addition, we will add some significant moisture as we start the month of May off.This weekend will be sunny, warm, and dry, and we may see some planting progress in areas that were at the very low end of rain totals this past week before the end of the day Sunday. However, clouds build quickly late Sunday night, and showers develop overnight through Monday midday. That wave of moisture brings .25”-.75”. After a 12-18 hour break, rain is back from late Tuesday through Wednesday early afternoon. That second surge brings another .25”-.75”. Thunderstorms are possible out of these batches of moisture but will not be rampant. Combined totals for the first half of the week will end up at .5”-1.5” with coverage at 90%. The best rains will be in southern IndianaWe get 24 hours precipitation free from Wednesday afternoon through Thursday afternoon. Then, a frontal boundary slides through the eastern corn belt Thursday night into midday Friday. Moisture with that front is not as impressive but will still likely have nearly 100% coverage with totals half an inch or less. What sets that round of moisture apart will be the significantly colder air that follows it into the state. We expect to be much colder Friday afternoon, and the chill stays through the weekend. We should see some sun, but the cool air mass will promote clouds and honestly, we won’t even rule out an isolated shower or two, the way things sit right now.Next week, temps start to moderate right away. However, as the warm air lifts north, precipitation likely comes too. Southern Indiana can see scattered showers for Monday the 10th, while the rest of the state sees action hold off until Tuesday afternoon.  Overall, though, this does not lead to any more than 2-3 days of rain free weather at any point in time in the next 10 days, and with poor drying conditions even when we are rain free. This, combined with the significant rain totals combined over the next 10 days (See map), leads us to question how much we really get accomplished from Monday forward, at least this week and perhaps all the way into midmonth. We will point out, that models are dancing around all over the place and do not have significant agreement on the pattern as a whole. Some are significantly wetter, others drier. Basically…feel free to hope we are wrong and too wet in our outlook for this week!Extended Period:The extended pattern begins with that shower activity Tuesday afternoon through Wednesday, and that could produce .25”-1” with 75% coverage. From there, we see drier potential for Thursday the 13th and Friday the 14th, with above normal temps and southwest winds. Showers and thunderstorms could return for Saturday the 15th.Weeks 3 & 4:Weeks three and four are trending cooler than our recent pattern. We see temps both weeks now near normal for the time of year, rather than several degrees above. This is likely due in part to more clouds. We see week 3 above normal over most of Indiana for precipitation, and week 4 will be normal to above. This may mean we see some challenges to long term dry windows to continue planting at anything more than a normal to slower than normal pace.Week 3Precipitation (green: above normal, brown: below)Temperatures (blue: below normal, orange: above)Week 4Precipitation (green: above normal, brown: belowTemperatures (blue: below normal, orange: above) Previous articleMarestail Burndown: What Options are Available?Next articleUSDA: Biden’s First 100 Days Ryan Martinlast_img read more

Man charged with assault after attempting to run over spouse

first_img WhatsApp Previous article052719_Memorial_Day_Ride_51Next article052719_Memorial_Day_Ride_55 Digital AIM Web Support Twitter Adrian Garcia Flores A 33-year-old man reportedly assaulted and attempted to run over his common-law spouse after returning home from a party upset, an Ector County Sheriff’s Office affidavit stated. Ector County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched at about 7:40 a.m. Sunday to West Orange Street about a disturbance and found Adrian Garcia Flores in a blue 2005 Chevy Tahoe. Flores’ common-law spouse told deputies that Flores had repeatedly assaulted her by punching her in the face with a closed fist causing bruising and redness. When she attempted to flee, he then pulled a black knife from his pocket, and in close proximity made stabbing and slicing motions and told her she was not going anywhere, the affidavit detailed. When the woman tried to flee the residence, she said Flores then attempted to run her over with the Tahoe. Flores was arrested and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony. He has a $20,000 bond and remained in custody as of Tuesday afternoon, jail records show.  Twitter TAGS  Local News By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 center_img Pinterest Facebook Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Man charged with assault after attempting to run over spouselast_img read more

ME now recognised as a chronic illness

first_imgME now recognised as a chronic illnessOn 1 Mar 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Health professionals have been told to recognise Chronic Fatigue Syndromeand Myalgic Encephalomyelitis as a chronic illness. The Government-backed independent working group into the condition, whichpublished its report in January, also said early recognition of the conditionwith a positive diagnosis was the key to improving the outcome. While it identified GPs as key carers of patients with the condition, itadmitted patients often had difficulties accessing care. There was also a lackof good research on the condition. Professor Allen Hutchinson, chairman of the working group, said: “Wehave achieved agreement on many aspects of care for people with CFS/ME, eventhough some differences of opinion remain over the best ways of managing theillness.” The DOH has asked the Medical Research Council to develop a broad strategyfor advancing biomedical and health services research on the condition. www.doh.gov.uk/cmo/publications.htm Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more