HR calls for block on planned EU temps directive

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. HR calls for block on planned EU temps directiveOn 12 Mar 2002 in Personnel Today Nearly 60 per cent of HR professionals want the UK to block EU legislationgiving temporary staff the same rights to remuneration as full-time staff. The survey, by law firm DMH, finds almost 30 per cent of the 400 HRprofessionals surveyed would reduce the number of temps they employ if theplanned EU directive is introduced. More than half of the respondents would consider employing temporary staff directlyand 33 per cent anticipate using full-time cover staff to fill gaps. Rustom Tata, an employment lawyer and partner at DMH, said: “Employersin the UK use the greatest percentage of agency staff proportionately in theEU. “Business will need to encourage the Government to take their interestsand concerns on board as regards the detail of any final directive in thisarea. “The real question is whether the anticipated reduction in the use ofagency staff will create a corresponding increase in permanent jobs. The surveyshows that this will not necessarily result from these changes.” www.dmh.co.uk Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Brazil’s Military Prepares to Fight Biological, Chemical, Nuclear Attacks during 2016 Rio Olympics

first_imgArmed Forces authorities are engaged in detailed planning that will help the Military conduct reconnaissance, gather intelligence, identify threats, prevent attacks, and reduce damages from any assaults, according to Major Luiz Carlos Lott Guimarães, chief of the CBRND Section of the Army’s Land Operations Command (Coter), headquartered in Brasília. In the event of an attack or an accident, victims would initially be treated in the contaminated area. By Dialogo January 27, 2015 Like its country’s best athletes, Brazil’s Armed Forces are busy preparing for the 2016 Olympic Games, which will be held in Rio de Janeiro from August 5-21. As part of the preventive effort, the Brazilian Army will use three mobile laboratories, which will house samples of dangerous substances and their antidotes. The Army already has one of the labs, which was used during the 2014 World Cup. Brazil’s CBRND preparations began following a four-day conference in early December in Brasília, where members of the Brazilian Military met with Armed Forces officials from the United Kingdom. British Military authorities shared their experiences providing security for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. In the event of an attack or an accident, victims would initially be treated in the contaminated area. Six CBRND physicians, two nurses, and 11 nursing assistants are assigned to the IMAE. By the end of 2015, their ranks will be buttressed by an additional 30 medical personnel. “With the arrival of these large events, the Ministry of Defense has identified a need for the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) to be prepared as well,” explained First Lieutenant, Paulo Pires Jr., medical doctor and assistant chief of the IMAE Operational Health Subdivision. “In the event of an accident or an attack, time is of the essence to minimize collateral damage,” Maj. Guimarães said. Recent terrorist attacks, such as the assault by two gunmen against the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on January 7, have raised the Brazilian Military’s alert level, even though the Rio Olympics are more than a year away. As part of the preventive effort, the Brazilian Army will use three mobile laboratories, which will house samples of dangerous substances and their antidotes. The Army already has one of the labs, which was used during the 2014 World Cup. Brazil’s CBRND preparations began following a four-day conference in early December in Brasília, where members of the Brazilian Military met with Armed Forces officials from the United Kingdom. British Military authorities shared their experiences providing security for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. The Army plans on training civilians in the Identification of Terrorist Threats Protocol. During the 2014 World Cup, officials and support teams from the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) received this training, as were employees of federal government agencies. Great! Great! Great! My sister went missing in 2012. I want to find her more than anything. I think it’s great to give all possible support. The Armed Forces are held in high esteem by the Brazilian people. I am so proud to love and admire them. I’d like to keep getting news about Paulo Lopes. I hope they teach Paraguayan peers that in Paraguay speaking about biological or chemical weapons is taboo. My goodness, that is something else. I liked it. It was very practical. Great I look forward to a military intervention authorized by the Constitution! What’s being done to Brazil and the Holy Scripture is very disrespectful to the Armed Forces and the nation. I request with the utmost respect that you take an oath to die for your country. I have always been proud of the Armed Forces and still am. I would like the Brazilian Army to free Brazil of the corrupt officials destroying our homeland. I hope the comments don’t get censured. I sincerely admire and am very proud of my country’s armed forces. The greatest enemies of Brazil are the corrupt politicians. I think it’s best to fight them. I will never get information from this network again. Great. The government has to invest more in the Armed Forces of Brazil. “The exercises will involve the entire chain of action, from contact from the incident site to the final mission, which is the transportation of the victim after decontamination,” according to 1st. Lt. Pires Jr. “We are going to train exhaustively to mitigate the risk.” The different branches of the Armed Forces – the Army, Air Force, and Navy – are working together in the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense (CBRND) system during the Olympics. “The team responsible for taking the injured from the hot zone (where the incident occurred) to the hospital is the Ministry of Health team,” Maj. Guimarães said. “Air transport will be handled by the Air Force.” Surveillance will focus on Rio “The environment is one of reducing violence,” Maj. Guimarães said. “We did have a terrorist attack during the Munich Olympics in 1972.” He was referring to the terrorist attack by the Palestinian group Black September which killed 11 Israeli athletes and one German police officer. German police killed five of the eight Black September attackers and captured the three survivors. While Military personnel are preparing to respond to any location, Rio de Janeiro will be the primary focus of CBRND surveillance. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has divided the locations for the sports competitions into four clusters: Barra, Deodoro, Copacabana, and Maracanã. While Military personnel are preparing to respond to any location, Rio de Janeiro will be the primary focus of CBRND surveillance. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has divided the locations for the sports competitions into four clusters: Barra, Deodoro, Copacabana, and Maracanã. The task of guarding against unconventional attacks involving biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear weapons during the Olympic Games is a bigger challenge than any the Armed Faces have previously faced. The Air Force prepares for the Rio Olympics However, the Army’s CBRND section, which has a training center is located in Rio’s Realengo neighborhood, consists of two Military units: one Battalion with 409 Troops, located in Rio, and one Company with 100 Soldiers, located in GoiâniaThe Center is used to train Brazilian Military members, as well as Armed Forces officers from other countries. The importance of technology Under the Military’s plan, doctors, nurses, radiologists, and support personnel will work in shifts during the duration of the Olympics. The first step would be to isolate the area. Next, specialized CBRND teams would conduct reconnaissance in the contaminated area, which would help Military medical officials determine what they need to do to minimize the harm. “In the event of an accident or an attack, time is of the essence to minimize collateral damage,” Maj. Guimarães said. While the Army will oversee the use of the mobile labs, the Air Force is preparing to transport victims of unconventional attacks or accidents at event locations. The Air Force is creating specialized teams, under the direction of the Aerospace Medical Institute (IMAE), which is located in Rio de Janeiro, on the Air Force University (Unifa) campus. In addition to training for athletic competitions, the Military is getting ready to deal with any biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear attack or accident that might occur during the competition. “People think the Olympics are like another World Cup, but they aren’t. The Olympics are several World Cups,” Maj. Guimarães added. “Brazil traditionally has not been a focal point [for terrorist attacks], but we cannot eliminate any risk.” Under the Military’s plan, doctors, nurses, radiologists, and support personnel will work in shifts during the duration of the Olympics. The other two labs are being purchased from a private company in the United States, at a total cost of $1.8 million. These labs will be transported to Brazil and also deployed in Rio. “The environment is one of reducing violence,” Maj. Guimarães said. “We did have a terrorist attack during the Munich Olympics in 1972.” He was referring to the terrorist attack by the Palestinian group Black September which killed 11 Israeli athletes and one German police officer. German police killed five of the eight Black September attackers and captured the three survivors. “We use detectors that function with ions and can access a vast library to identify chemical, radiological, and nuclear agents. The substances are identified at the mobile laboratory,” Maj. Guimarães said. In addition to training for athletic competitions, the Military is getting ready to deal with any biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear attack or accident that might occur during the competition. Military authorities have conducted two training courses for doctors, nurses, and nurses assistants since 2013, and are planning to provide two more by the end of 2015. “The team responsible for taking the injured from the hot zone (where the incident occurred) to the hospital is the Ministry of Health team,” Maj. Guimarães said. “Air transport will be handled by the Air Force.” The Brazilian Military activated the joint CBRND system to provide security during the World Military Games in 2011, and again for the World Cup in 2014. However, the Army’s CBRND section, which has a training center is located in Rio’s Realengo neighborhood, consists of two Military units: one Battalion with 409 Troops, located in Rio, and one Company with 100 Soldiers, located in GoiâniaThe Center is used to train Brazilian Military members, as well as Armed Forces officers from other countries. Brazilian Military prepares for an unprecedented challenge Using devices which detect chemical, biological, and nuclear material, the Army will monitor three areas and the Navy one, Copacabana. For the soccer stadiums located outside these areas, the Army’s CBRND section will monitor São Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Brasília from a distance, while the Navy will do the same for Salvador. The Air Force prepares for the Rio Olympics Surveillance will focus on Rio The Brazilian Military activated the joint CBRND system to provide security during the World Military Games in 2011, and again for the World Cup in 2014. “The exercises will involve the entire chain of action, from contact from the incident site to the final mission, which is the transportation of the victim after decontamination,” according to 1st. Lt. Pires Jr. “We are going to train exhaustively to mitigate the risk.” Technology is a crucial part of the effort to prevent a dirty bomb attack, other types of unconventional assaults, and damaging accidents involving the release of dangerous substances into the environment. The importance of technology “We use detectors that function with ions and can access a vast library to identify chemical, radiological, and nuclear agents. The substances are identified at the mobile laboratory,” Maj. Guimarães said. The different branches of the Armed Forces – the Army, Air Force, and Navy – are working together in the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense (CBRND) system during the Olympics. Like its country’s best athletes, Brazil’s Armed Forces are busy preparing for the 2016 Olympic Games, which will be held in Rio de Janeiro from August 5-21. The task of guarding against unconventional attacks involving biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear weapons during the Olympic Games is a bigger challenge than any the Armed Faces have previously faced. Using devices which detect chemical, biological, and nuclear material, the Army will monitor three areas and the Navy one, Copacabana. For the soccer stadiums located outside these areas, the Army’s CBRND section will monitor São Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Brasília from a distance, while the Navy will do the same for Salvador. The Army plans on training civilians in the Identification of Terrorist Threats Protocol. During the 2014 World Cup, officials and support teams from the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) received this training, as were employees of federal government agencies. The other two labs are being purchased from a private company in the United States, at a total cost of $1.8 million. These labs will be transported to Brazil and also deployed in Rio. Each training session lasts five days, with lessons conducted eight hours a day. About 30 medical personnel will participate in each training session, during which they will wear special protective clothing as they go through drills on how to detect chemical and biological agents and decontaminate people who have been exposed to harmful substances. Technology is a crucial part of the effort to prevent a dirty bomb attack, other types of unconventional assaults, and damaging accidents involving the release of dangerous substances into the environment. “With the arrival of these large events, the Ministry of Defense has identified a need for the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) to be prepared as well,” explained First Lieutenant, Paulo Pires Jr., medical doctor and assistant chief of the IMAE Operational Health Subdivision. While the Army will oversee the use of the mobile labs, the Air Force is preparing to transport victims of unconventional attacks or accidents at event locations. The Air Force is creating specialized teams, under the direction of the Aerospace Medical Institute (IMAE), which is located in Rio de Janeiro, on the Air Force University (Unifa) campus. Recent terrorist attacks, such as the assault by two gunmen against the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on January 7, have raised the Brazilian Military’s alert level, even though the Rio Olympics are more than a year away. “People think the Olympics are like another World Cup, but they aren’t. The Olympics are several World Cups,” Maj. Guimarães added. “Brazil traditionally has not been a focal point [for terrorist attacks], but we cannot eliminate any risk.” The first step would be to isolate the area. Next, specialized CBRND teams would conduct reconnaissance in the contaminated area, which would help Military medical officials determine what they need to do to minimize the harm. Armed Forces authorities are engaged in detailed planning that will help the Military conduct reconnaissance, gather intelligence, identify threats, prevent attacks, and reduce damages from any assaults, according to Major Luiz Carlos Lott Guimarães, chief of the CBRND Section of the Army’s Land Operations Command (Coter), headquartered in Brasília. Six CBRND physicians, two nurses, and 11 nursing assistants are assigned to the IMAE. By the end of 2015, their ranks will be buttressed by an additional 30 medical personnel. Brazilian Military prepares for an unprecedented challenge Military authorities have conducted two training courses for doctors, nurses, and nurses assistants since 2013, and are planning to provide two more by the end of 2015. Each training session lasts five days, with lessons conducted eight hours a day. About 30 medical personnel will participate in each training session, during which they will wear special protective clothing as they go through drills on how to detect chemical and biological agents and decontaminate people who have been exposed to harmful substances. last_img read more

University Advancement making plans to work with next administration

first_imgMany students know USC raises a lot of money from alumni and other donors, but few know about the person whose job it is to raise that money.Money talks · Sam Lopez, USC’s new assistant vice president for advancement communications, will work with President-elect C. L. Max Nikias on future fundraising efforts. – Sunil Murali | Daily Trojan For the past five weeks that person has been Sam Lopez, USC’s new assistant vice president for advancement communications.“Fundraising is an art form,” Lopez said. “There are many ways it can be done. In the world of communications, we help get messages to the donors. We help connect the great ideas and talent of this university to its sponsors.”Lopez said forming strong relationships between donors and the university is crucial to raising money.“It’s about tailoring the message to the audience,” Lopez said. “We form partnerships between donors and what they care about. It’s like matchmaking.”Though a major aspect of Lopez’s job is to raise funds for the school, his job also encompasses updating the school’s infrastructure. The Division of University Advancement constantly evaluates how the school does business and works to make enhancements that will raise the overall quality and cost-effectiveness of the university.Re-evaluating the current infrastructure is especially important now, Lopez said, since USC’s administration will be facing changes upon President Steven B. Sample’s retirement. He has to ensure the office of advancement is working to meet the needs of the current administration, as well as the next.“USC raises a lot of money,” Lopez said. “We’re one of the top universities for that, and we don’t want to lose that momentum.”Courtney Surls, vice president of development, said a smooth presidential transition is something the Division of University Advancement has been preparing for the past two years.“We know that [Nikias] has a bold vision for the future that will build on everything President Sample has already done,” Surls said.Nikias’ aspirations for USC include doubling the size of the school’s endowment.“He’s very focused on fundraising,” Surls said. “We’re making sure we have our systems and procedures aligned, that we have the right people in place, that it’s a very professionalized system.”Peter Lasher, associate senior vice president for development, agreed.“[Nikias] is coming in with a very ambitious plan,” Lasher said. “We have to help translate it into different donor postulations and help them understand how their private donations will make a difference.”Lopez’s job is also made more difficult by the recent economic crisis, which has affected schools’ fundraising all across the nation.“USC donations dropped 9.8 percent last [fiscal] year,” Lopez said. “It was still less than the national average, which was 11.9 percent. But as confidence in the economy returns, so will philanthropy.”Lopez, however, said the biggest challenge facing USC isn’t fundraising at all, but changing certain perceptions about the school.“Our biggest challenge is overcoming the perception that we don’t need resources,” Lopez said. “Without the support of alumni and friends, this place wouldn’t have the quality of education, research, academic programs, sports and more, that it has. It would be devastating.”Lasher said the office needs to ensure that every small donation goes appreciated.“Sometimes when we think about donors, we think about a big monolithic group,” Lasher said. “But we’re expecting a different kind of generation, and the practices we’ve traditionally used are evolving.”Lopez, who’s been working in higher-education communication for 16 years and at three other universities, added that working in the division of university advancement has been great so far.“There’s a lot of collegiality among advancement staff,” Lopez said. “A university is many pieces, and one area helps raise other areas.”Though most students don’t know anything about the division of university advancement, it’s a function that all schools have and Lopez is more than happy to spread the word.“The future philanthropists are current students, so it’s great to spread the word about what we do,” Lopez said.last_img read more

10-year-old fan sends pocket money to help out financially embattled Plymouth Argyle

first_imgAdvertisement 84eiNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsbviWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E5a19( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) nilb6Would you ever consider trying this?😱2d9Can your students do this? 🌚7qpaaRoller skating! Powered by Firework In a heart-warming gesture, a young Plymouth Argyle fan has sent his pocket money to his favourite team in order to help them during the financial crisis caused by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Argyle who play in the League Two championship (the fourth tier of English football) are facing difficult financial pressures along with the other League Two clubs amid the nationwide lockdown. Advertisement 10-year-old Kasra Sherrell, recently sent a few dollars, to the club’s chairman Simon Hallett along with a supportive letter.Advertisement “I hope this does the club some good,” he wrote. “I hope that we all come through this crisis very soon. I can’t wait for the Green Army to set sail once again!”Image Courtesy: Plymouth Argyle FCKasra’s dad Matt claims to be a lifelong Argyle even after emigrating to the United States. Last August during a family trip to the United Kingdom, Matt took his son to the stadium and Kasra was eventually included as a mascot against Argyle’s Leyton Orient fixture.Advertisement “We have lived away from the UK for many years – in Hong Kong and New York – but Kasra follows Argyle’s fortunes from afar, and we always watch match highlights,” Matt told the Plymouth website.“He gets lots of questions from his school friends in America when he wears the Green Army kit.”“Kasra and his two sisters have been to watch the Pilgrims twice as we visit the West Country every summer,” he added.Meanwhile, Hallett has issued a warning about the financial issues his club and other League Two teams are facing during the crisis.Even though the multi-millionaire businessman assured manager Ryan Lowe that Argyle will be financially ‘stable’ during the crisis, the club are on the verge to make a few difficult decisions on future budgets, which inspired Kasra to donate.“We recognise that budgets for future seasons will be drastically reduced and new contracts are highly unlikely to be offered on terms similar to those given in previous years,” Hallett said in a statement.“We own our stadium, are almost entirely debt free and I am prepared, in the short-term, to provide the financial support to see us through this difficult time.”“Make no mistake though, this crisis has presented an existential threat to all football clubs. We are stronger than most, but not invincible” he added. If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.comAlso follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.com You may also like:Ligue 1 season first major European football league to be cancelledPremier League clubs set to consult players for a 30% wage slash amid Coronavirus pandemic  Advertisementlast_img read more