Christchurch fund raiser organised in London

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tickets range from £350-500 per ticket or £3000-4000 for a table of 10 and there are a limited number of tables available with rotating celebrity hosts. For more information on tickets, sponsorship packages, donation of auction items or the event itself please contact Melissa Gilmour on [email protected] or 08451 276676.Details on the event can be viewed at www.chchfundraiser.com Zinzan Brooke said today, “this event is just one example of how the Kiwi expat community here in London is banding together to make sure all levels of support available reach the Christchurch community. We hope that this event can help towards the rebuild which is the important part of everyone’s focus now.”Sean Fitzpatrick said today, “I never thought I would be in a situation where we had to rally together for a major New Zealand city in this way and I remain in awe of what the people of Christchurch must be going through. We want to send a message to Christchurch that the international Kiwi community is still batting for them.”center_img New Zealand’s rugby and cricket greats are teaming together to assist in raising money for Christchurch, New Zealand and support the New Zealand Gala Fundraiser which features a special performance by Neil Finn of Crowded House.Zinzan Brooke, Jeremy Coney, Sean Fitzpatrick and Anton Oliver are banding together to host tables and bring in some auction items for the 5 July event, which will take place in the newly renovated Lancaster Ballroom at The Savoy Hotel on The Strand. With the help of donated money can’t buy auction items and experiences, organisers are hoping to raise in excess of £100,000.Three’s A Crowd Events (www.3sacrowd.com) is producing the gala fundraiser to send a message to the people of Christchurch that, even several months after the earthquake, the international community has not forgotten them and remains committed to offering support despite yet more major tremors affecting the city earlier today.last_img read more

Ireland U20s side to take on South Africa

first_imgIreland U20s coach Mike RuddockThe Ireland Under 20 team to face South Africa in the Junior World Championship has been named. This match forms part of the 5th – 8th place play-off at the championship with the final placing to be decided by the last game on Sunday the 26th June.Under 20’s coach Mike Ruddock has made just one change to the side that won against Scotland in their final pool game of the tournament with David Doyle starting in the back row. Finlay Bealham and Alex Kelly have been named among the replacements. Speaking ahead of the game, Ruddock said “It’s not that often that you get the opportunity to benchmark yourselves against the might of South Africa at this age grade and so having a second chance within eight days is rather unique. It is up to my players to put into practice the lessons learnt last time out. If we do that then we will improve our performance. If we improve on our last performance then we will be in the game big time.”Ireland U20s LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 13 – Brendan Macken (Blackrock/Leinster)12 – Luke Marshall (Ballymena/Ulster)11 – Andrew Boyle (UCD/Leinster)10 – Paddy Jackson (Dungannon/Ulster)9 – Kieran Marmion (UWIC/Exile)1 – James Tracy (UCD/Leinster)2 – Niall Annett (Belfast Harlequins/Ulster) (capt)3 – Tadhg Furlong (Clontarf/Leinster)4 – Michael Kearney (Clontarf/Leinster)5 – Iain Henderson (Queen’s University/Ulster) Daniel6 – Eoin McKeon (Galwegians/Connacht)7 – David Doyle (UCD/Leinster)8 – Jordi Murphy (Lansdowne/Leinster) Replacements16 – Finlay Bealham (Belfast Harlequins – Ulster)17 – Conor Carey (Ballymena/Ulster)18 – Daniel Qualter (Buccaneers/Connacht)19 – Shane Buckley (Garryowen/Munster)20 – Peter du Toit (UCD/Leinster)21 – James McKinney (Queen’s University/Ulster)22 – Alex Kelly (UCD – Leinster)center_img 15 – Tiernan O’Halloran (Galwegians/Connacht)14 – Andrew Conway (Blackrock/Leinster)last_img read more

Win a scholarship to a New Zealand academy!

first_img3. A 50-word explanation of why you think you deserve to win.To find out more about how Ward-Smith overcame the disappointment of retiring to find his dream job, check out the latest issue of Rugby World. New role: Dan Ward-Smith explains a drill to some Inside Running Academy members in New ZealandTHIS COMPETITION could change your life! Dan Ward-Smith, the former Bristol, Wasps and England Saxons back-row, is now managing the Inside Running Academy in New Zealand – and they are offering one lucky Rugby World reader the chance to train in Mount Maunganui.England days: Ward-Smith in action in 2010Ward-Smith was forced to retire in 2011 because of a back injury and returned to his native New Zealand with his family, where he’s now enjoying his new role with the academy. He says: “I’m extremely fortunate that I’ve found something fulfilling. Seeing someone put into action what you’ve helped them with is different to scoring a try or winning a lineout, but it’s equally, if not more, rewarding.”Now here’s your chance to improve your rugby skills under the guidance of Ward-Smith and the likes of Nic Gill, the All Blacks strength and conditioning coach. The winner of this fantastic prize will win a 12-week scholarship at the academy worth NZ$10,200 (£5,300). As well as the expert coaching, they will play for a local club in the Bay of Plenty and be able to explore New Zealand.Sessions will include strength & conditioning, skills and video analysis alongside club training. Accommodation, local transport and the majority of food is provided, although the winner will need extra money for food and entertainment (around £50 a week). Flights to New Zealand are NOT included.Great setting: the academy is in Mount MaunganuiCourses run until September and the winner, who should be over 18, can choose the time that suits them best.We’ll also run fortnightly progress reports on what the winner has been doing in New Zealand right here at rugbyworld.com LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img For a chance to win this great prize, email [email protected] by Friday 1 March, title it ‘Inside Running Comp’ and send us the following details:1. Your name, age and contact info.2. Your rugby position and experience – the level you played at, any representative honours etc.last_img read more

Welsh rugby: Five things we’ve learned in June

first_img Stay strong: Owen Williams has received messages of support from all over the world Owen WilliamsOwen Williams sustained a significant spinal cord injury whilst playing at the inaugural World Club 10s competition. You’ll often hear people refer to an event as ‘putting things in perspective’.  An event which makes the trivial concerns seem just that. Owen’s injury was one of those instances. It was genuinely upsetting to see such a player rich with promise and a fine young man too, suffer such cruel misfortune.Owen’s accident drew support from all around the globe with fans and players taking to social media. The hashtag #staystrongforows dominated rugby timelines and illustrated the deep concern that people have for Owen. Thankfully, he has now returned to Wales with his family, where he will continue his rehabilitation. Good luck, Owen.  Everyone is behind you.Still waiting: The RRW and WRU are still to agree on a Participation Agreement to move forwardParticipation agreement endsWelsh rugby has been playing ‘countdown’ with the Participation Agreement (P.A.) for quite a while. But June saw the ticking finally come to an end. Leaving Welsh rugby with a real conundrum.I’ll leave you to solve it – SHTISTOMRWithout the P.A. Welsh rugby could fall into chaos in a very short space of time – even more chaos, if that’s possible. The PA is Welsh rugby. It is the foundation on which all regional rugby and test rugby is run in Wales. It dictates release dates for test players, Welsh player quotas, remuneration for the regions and this time round may even include the allocation of centrally contracted players. Rumours suggest that the new PA is close to being finalised in the coming weeks. Fingers and toes crossed.Lower League restructuresYou could be forgiven for thinking that Welsh rugby’s problems are limited to the elite game. But no. Welsh rugby has many problems, on many levels – so much so that it would be a perfect sponsorship fit for NCP car parks. The most recent of which has been the restructuring of Wales’ lower leagues. June saw the passing of the new structure by a vote of 61% (70% of those eligible voted). But whilst it is undoubtedly positive that a resolution has been found; some remain unconvinced.The restructure will see reduced travelling to away games for certain clubs, lowering travel costs – which are a major headache for smaller clubs. However concerns have been raised that the restructure will also see teams from lower divisions pitted against teams from higher divisions – the possible difference in quality, size and fitness of the opposition leading to demoralising margins of defeat and potentially posing an injury risk. It will be interesting to see if the experiment works. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Goodwill abounds for Owen Williams, the Participation Agreement deadline passes, Ian Evans heads over the Severn Bridge and an improved Wales are all covered Pride is back: Wales’ much improved performance has raised spiritsThe 2nd test was a commercial win for WalesWales’ performance in the  Second Test was vitally important for Wales – but not just on the field. The commercial impact of the performance will have made the Autumn International fixtures a far easier sell – and Welsh rugby needs every penny that it can get.Pushing tickets, advertising space and corporate boxes is hard enough in the current climate – selling them to punters who think that Wales are unable to compete with the big three from the southern Hemisphere, would be a tall order. Wales’ display in the second test would have undoubtedly pleased Warren Gatland, Rob Howley, and Robyn McBryde – but it will also have brought a Cheshire cat sized-smile to the face of the WRU’s commercial team.Bristol-bound: Ian Evans chose the best domestic offer on the tableBristol sign Ian EvansJune saw Bristol RFC announce yet another marquee signing in Ian Evans. It was yet another enormous show of power and wealth from Bristol and has added to what is essentially an AVIVA Premiership squad. However, whilst Evans’ signing was lauded in the West Country it was met with jeers and boos from Wales.But why? You can’t blame Ian Evans for signing a lucrative contract at the age of 29 – especially with his injury record. You can’t blame Bristol for using their substantial player budget to lure the best playing talent available, particularly at this late stage in June. And you also can’t blame Sean Holley for using his relationship with his former players – that’s what good coaches do. If you’re looking to point the finger – point it at the delayed Participation Agreement. If the extra money that is rumoured to be part of the new deal had been allocated to the regions earlier they would have been more able to be more competitive in the transfer market.last_img read more

Hotshots: Meet Scarlets young gun Steffan Hughes

first_img When did you first play?I started when I was about ten. A couple of mates were playing at Llanelli Wanderers and my dad took me down there.Have you played in different positions?  I’ve always been a back, but I’ve moved about a lot. I settled in the centre with Llanelli U15. I’ve played inside- and outside-centre for Wales U20.When did you first play representative rugby?I played for Scarlets U16 and then Wales U16. I played for Scarlets U18and then got offered an academy contract.Are you happy being Wales captain this year?It’s an honour and something you dream of doing as a boy. I captained my school and I was head boy as well, which helped I think. I am quite happy being a leader. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW verdict: Hughes has already played for the Scarlets, and we can expect to see more of him in future.This Hotshot was first published in the April 2014 edition of Rugby World. Click here to find out what’s in this month’s mag! Leadership material: Hughes in action for Wales at the Junior World Cup Who are your mentors?At Ysgol y Strade, the teachers Arwyn Thomas and Deiniol Evans really got me started with rugby.What else do you do?I was at Swansea University last year doing sports and exercise science. I have taken a year out to give rugby more time but I hope to go back to it.What are your aims now?The short-term goal is to get to the U20 World Cup and be successful. We lost in the final last year and I learned a lot that day.last_img read more

Autumn International player analysis: Chris Robshaw, England

first_img Glories of war: Chris Rosbhaw holds the Cook Cup aloft at Twickenham Chris Robshaw’s brilliant breakdown performance in England’s 26-17 win over Australia should have finally silenced his remaining doubters. We pick out the highlights of his display. The most effective proponents of the ‘jackal’ – the art of crouching over the ball and forcing the player on the floor to be penalised for holding on – generate a collective anxiety among the opposition.Rivals always have Hooper, Richie McCaw and Peter O’Mahony in the back of their minds on attack. Austin Healey has admitted that one England squad member wore a ‘Brian O’Driscoll bib’ for the training week leading up to Ireland matches and spent rucking drills purposely misbehaving.Here, the knock-on effect of Robshaw’s excellent first-half is evident as Sam Carter clears him out from the side illegally. Before that though, we see the England captain’s innate desire and work ethic as he leads the line:Andy Farrell is less fussed about dog legs and spacing than he is about putting pressure on carriers – he calls his defensive system a ‘messy’ one and it is focussed on disruption.Sean McMahon actually steps past Robshaw, but Wood makes a superb chop tackle. Robshaw wheels around to threaten the ruck and Carter, clearly fretting about the prospect of another turnover, rushes into an unlawful clear-out:England 13-3 Australia, 54 minutes: Rescue actInto the second half now and the midst of Australia’s strongest period. Here, they probe the wide channel and the Wood-Robshaw combination strikes with a tackle-turnover once more. However, most impressive is what happens a phase earlier.Breakdowns are about decision-making as much as anything else – not hitting the beach at every ruck but picking your moments. Watch Ben Alexander’s carry again. Robshaw thinks about committing, but bails out and evades McMahon’s clear-out so he can stay on his feet:It is a selfless option that pays dividends seconds later.England 20-10 Australia, 58 minutes: Reception committeeTackle counts are a big part of what makes Robshaw a special player. Put simply, his engine is astounding. On Saturday he felled 14 runners, but this one is about quality rather than quantity.Will Skelton, a 140-kilogram lock has just come on. Australia look to get him into the game right away but Robshaw leads by example and cuts off the Waratahs behemoth behind the gain-line. Skelton scored a few phases later, but the sentiment remains admirable.England 23-17 Australia, 68 minutes: Still spoilingIsrael Folau and Hooper outstrip Robshaw comfortably in pursuit of Owen Farrell’s hack through. Even so, this clip epitomises industriousness, especially given everything that had gone on before.England 23-17 Australia, 74 minutes: Suffocating Australia This autumn, Graham Rowntree’s pack has reinforced its class. In fact, England probably possess the best tight-five options in the world right now. The lineout maul is definitely on a par with South Africa’s for consistent destruction.This one rumbled over the Wallaby 10-metre line and England then won the match-clinching penalty out wide. You can probably guess who spearheaded the charge:Maggie Alphonsi, another England openside, lives by the motto “be so good they can’t ignore you.” Since being left out of the 2011 World Cup party by Martin Johnson, Robshaw has embodied that. The development he has undergone over his 32 caps thus far has been pretty amazing to watch. This weekend was his most influential Test as a breakdown scavenger, something he has worked hard at improving on.Regardless of the considerable talents of contenders Steffon Armitage, Will Fraser and Matt Kvesic – plus the fact that England’s skipper could play at six as well– it is lunacy to slap the lazy ‘not a proper seven’ label on Robshaw. Hopefully those calls finally dry up with this fantastic performance.center_img A trivia question to start, so no cheating if you do not know the answer. Here you go: who said this about whom last week?“He’s an absolute pest. Last year he had a really good performance against us around the ruck and made it a really tough night for us.”There is not much point in building suspense. This was Australia skipper Michael Hooper, arguably the best pilfering openside on the planet, speaking about Chris Robshaw, a figure many still do not rate as a ‘proper seven’ – whatever that vague, fluffy phrase even means.And the outstanding Wallaby should know. While he has caused total havoc consistently throughout his young but brilliant Test career, two of his least effective games have come against England. Twelve months ago, Hooper was crowded into anonymity as the hosts triumphed 20-13 at Twickenham. Robshaw won the official man-of-the-match gong.On Saturday, he latched on for an early penalty and charged around athletically. However, he was comprehensively outdone by the England back row. Tom Wood was relentless, Ben Morgan barged to a brace of tries and Robshaw seemed utterly inspired when the ball was on the ground. Here is a run-down of his awesome afternoon.England 0-0 Australia, 1 minute: Early set-backEven accounting for the fact that England survived on grisly scraps – just 34 per cent of possession over the 80 minutes – the fact that they only had 36 rucks is amazing. By comparison, Australia’s commitment to keeping ball in hand saw them get through 112.In any case, it is significant that Robshaw carries for this first turnover. Of course, that means he is not there to secure the ruck. Billy Twelvetrees does not identify the threat of Hooper and clears Rob Horne instead. By the time Dylan Hartley and David Wilson arrive, it is too late. Following this false start, England tightened up markedly at the breakdown with Robshaw driving the standards.England 0-3 Australia, 4 minutes: Linking attackField position meant England could show some early spark and they went through the phases nicely. Robshaw’s slip pass to Wood here is a trademark piece of skill. This is his bread and butter. He is so good at transferring the point of contact to unbalance defenders. Watch how the excellent Matt Toomua must adjust and an overlap is created momentarily:A punchy carry to challenge the fringes from the next ruck demonstrates Robshaw’s appetite for work in attack. England moved the ball left from here and won a penalty to level the scores. They spent long, long periods soaking up pressure from there, but their skipper stood firm.England 6-3 Australia, 25 minutes: Toomua turned overDuring the summer he spent at home while the 2013 Lions were touring, Robshaw sought out Australian forwards guru Laurie Fisher – the mentor of turnover pioneer and legendary Wallaby centurion George Smith – for tips on how best to improve his defensive breakdown skills.Here, the Harlequin stalks before Wilson makes the tackle. He then strikes and stays strong over the ball despite the dual challenge of Rob Simmons and James Slipper, who stack up to a combined weight of 232 kilograms. It is a copybook piece of work.England 6-3 Australia, 28 minutes: Rapid ruck-clear for Morgan’s tryThe roles of Wood and Morgan are easily more eye-catching here. Certainly, Wood’s slip pass is gorgeous and Morgan’s finish muscular. That said, the try comes about because of the speed of the breakdown following Barritt’s carry. Guess who helps secure the ball:As Morgan and Wood snake around the corner, Robshaw helps Anthony Watson secure possession and Ben Youngs can whip his pass away before the Australian line is set. It is a subtle but essential job – a hallmark of a fine openside flanker.England 13-3 Australia, 34 minutes: Phipps disruptedScrum-half Nick Phipps has personified the Wallabies’ admirable ambition this tour. Incredibly, he did not kick the ball once over five matches. His long, strong passing game is integral to the pacy, wide way Cheika wants to play. Here though, Robshaw is quick to fire through and forces the ball loose.It was nearly a try-scoring turnover too. Youngs hits a clever kick from the box and Watson and Brown win the chase, but neither can gather:England 13-3 Australia, 38 minutes: Another penalty earned LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Power play: The story of USA’s Alev Kelter

first_imgHis next memory was in the midst of a tournament, pressure on. Kelter came up to him and handed over a note, filled with observations she had made over their last six weeks together, including a picture of Abrahams’s daughter and a reminder on the lines of ‘keep smiling’.In training: Preparing in Sydney (Mike Lee/World Rugby)A centre in 15s but a scrum-half in sevens, Kelter talks about utilising a growth mindset in order to embrace change. Life has moving parts. The story goes that the Kelters moved four times before Alev and Derya were nine, owing to father Scott’s career in the Air Force.Alaska was were the twins were forged, and Alev jokes that life there could make even us rugged and adaptable. She is proud of the fact that the wild state has more registered youth players than any other in the US. She feels Alaskans also embrace the notion of coming through tests together; in weathering a shared hardship there grows respect. Then there’s the hiking, climbing, fishing and shooting. Alaskans relish the primal situations. Can rugby hone such instincts?“When I was in Rio for the Olympics all I could think about was surviving,” Kelter reflects. “It was about making it known that I was a decent athlete, keeping up with the crew. My first three months (in rugby) was just learning how to tackle. The second three months was perfecting the pass, then it was ‘If I can be the best kicker in the world, I’ll be on the pitch!’Olympic shot, 2016 (Getty)“I had more opportunities, experiences and visions to grow from and the more you play, the more those things happen innately. It can become second nature. So you have to play. It’s hard to watch!“Sevens is about seconds – if you turn off, that could be a try. We have a sports psychologist who teaches us that our thoughts and feelings are natural, they’re going to come up, but you then get to decide which ones to address, to buy into.“At the end of the day, how do you stay present? You set anchors. You might have a connection with your team-mate or a breath with your friend or, you know, you wipe the grass when you make a mistake. But you have to move on. So even if a mistake knocks you off your axis, you acknowledge it. It is keeping me present because I am acknowledging it. In a way it is good to have those moments.“It’s ‘hey, I’m noticing myself being a little frantic’. Or ‘I’m noticing that I missed this routine’. Then you can correct it.“I think there are some who use their superstitions as an excuse (to explain away mistakes) but acknowledging keeps you more present, in my mind.”What Kelter has learnt to love in rugby is the diversity of needs. On a circuit where the try-snaffling wingers get lots of credit for their finishing, she nods her appreciation for the player who hits ruck after ruck. It is a game, she says, for every character. Sure, in the abbreviated form of the sport there are more opportunities to showcase flair – and let’s be honest, as sevens fights for its place in rugby’s global market, everyone is a salesperson. But she would never want to be on a team of ‘showboats’.It is up to us to appreciate the myriad characters and player types within the sport. The game needs balance in several senses and while Kelter is clearly passionate, she also wants to make it clear that top-end rugby takes a lot of grit if you want to conquer it.Facing the media: Before the Olympics (Getty Images)Adding to this, with Tokyo in mind, Kelter says: “I told the team that we are set to leave a legacy, we’re set to ignite, unite and inspire, and what better way to do that than on an Olympic platform where millions are watching. I remember seeing the (astronomical) number that was written after our first game in Rio, of how many people watched our game. And that was an inspiration to us. People need to see it.“It’s cool to think I had an opportunity to play soccer or hockey, but to pioneer something that was so amazing, that I knew would blow up in America… The thought of that was so appealing.”In Rio de Janeiro in 2016, despite all the external pressures, Kelter relished slamming into every day of that event. As she puts it, it was “continuing to put yourself into that niche”. But that time, the Americans put so much stock in reaching the Olympic summit that they collectively decided it was best to miss the opening ceremony of the Games. They were at the closing party.Next time, they vow to be there as the fireworks go off on Day One of the 2021 Games. Then comes the real action. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As Alev Kelter is lured around the corporate box, pressing the flesh and repeating her story, the paparazzo snapping away cannot hide her glee. As we ask twin Derya if those shots will be used to torture her sister later, she replies: “Oh, you have no idea!”Getting hauled back to earth isn’t new for Kelter but before she was a rugby star, lauded on the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series, her biggest humbling happened when she still wore skates.“I played ice hockey and soccer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison,” the 29-year-old tells RW during the LA Sevens. “After college I had an opportunity to try out for the US Olympic hockey team. I had been in that programme since I was 14, so it was kind of natural. But I was third cut from the Olympic team for Sochi in 2014. It was devastating to me.“When I went home to Alaska, I was trying to figure out what was next. And it was kind of providential. I received a phone call from Ric Suggitt, who was the Olympic coach at the time for USA women’s rugby. He said, ‘I’d love you to come to San Diego and train for a couple weeks to see if you like the sport. I think you’d be a great, great fit.’“I was so nervous. I had just been cut from the Olympic team so I was pretty down in the dumps. I just wasn’t sure so I called my mom, to get her blessing on anything. And she said, ‘What’s the worst you can do? What’s the worst they can say – no? You’ve just heard that!’Ice warrior: Kelter in action for Wisconsin Badgers (University of Wisconsin)“So for me it was pretty inspiring to say I’m going to take this risk and it’s literally not about my performance or anything. It’s about my purpose and, for me, it was to build the platform and to reach as many people as possible. What better way to do that than the Olympics?“That’s why I had such a deep passion for the Olympics for hockey. I thought about it for soccer, too. I’d always split my time between them. This was the first time that I specialised in just one thing – I just never thought it would be rugby.”A central midfielder in soccer, Kelter says it was not about control there but rather that she saw the field differently from some peers. Once past her nerves, her perspective on rugby shifted too.Of her discovery Kelter says: “It was beautiful, like I was reborn, right?“The ethos of this game, its integrity, its respect, its camaraderie and family, brotherhood, sisterhood…”Hand off: Facing the Black Ferns (Getty Images)And you also get to smack people?“Sure, it’s like ‘catch me if you can’, and it’s all-out. Whereas in soccer it was always like, ‘you’re too aggressive’ or in hockey it’s like, ‘you can’t hit!’ Now it’s all out there. It’s like this ultimate battle, but there’s this ultimate respect level to it too, which I thought was amazing.”Kelter first got her hands on a rugby ball in January 2014. Five months later she was contracted by the US. By 2016 it was off to the Olympics in Brazil. Now it’s about preparing for another Games, this time in Tokyo, albeit after a year’s deferral due to the Covid-19 crisis.Kelter describes her introduction to the game as a “crash course”. Thrown straight in, she didn’t know you had to get back ten metres at certain restarts, she didn’t know you couldn’t hit anyone high. But she did have the athleticism and believed she would pick it up.“It was beautiful, like I was reborn, right?”According to the Alaskan, 12 years in elite programmes for other sports taught her the value of discipline and accepting how to keep working when things get tough. She is also thankful that there are pathway programmes for younger girls to play, a vital avenue for growing the sport, she tacks on.Warren Abrahams, until recently USA women’s sevens assistant coach, has two stories about Kelter. One highlights her skill level, the other her character.Abrahams was taken aback during one of his first sessions with the team when he clocked Kelter kicking restart after restart, first left foot, then right, then left again. Something he had seen England’s men work at over time. From the body-check of missing out on the Winter Olympics to becoming a star for the US sevens side, this is the tale of Alaska’s Alev Keltercenter_img Kelter class: Scoring in Glendale (Travis Prior/World Rugby) This article originally appeared in the August 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup match

first_img Rematch: Wales and Georgia last played at the 2019 World Cup (Getty Images) Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup matchWales and Georgia meet in the Autumn Nations Cup this evening at Parc y Scarlets, both looking to bounce back from defeats in the opening round.This will be only the third time the two countries have played each other, Wales winning 13-6 in 2017 and 43-14 at the 2019 World Cup.You can read our full Wales v Georgia match preview here and below we explain how to find a reliable live stream for Wales v Georgia wherever you are.How to watch Wales v Georgia from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Autumn Nations Cup coverage, like Wales v Georgia, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Autumn Nations Cup live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPNs and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, FloSports have the exclusive rights to show every Autumn Nations Cup match live. You can stream Wales v Georgia (kick-off 12.15pm EST and UK time 9.15am on the West coast) via FloSports or watch via the app.A FloRugby monthly subscription costs $29.99 and the annual subscription is $150, with both packages also giving you access to the entire FloSports network, which includes coverage of cycling,motorsport and American football.Sign up to FloRugby Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from the UKAmazon Prime Video are the main rights holders for the Autumn Nations Cup in the UK and will show Wales v Georgia (kick-off 5.15pm) live.If you’re an Amazon Prime member, coverage is included in your package. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, it costs £7.99 a month and you can cancel at any time, so you could just sign up for the period of the Autumn Nations Cup. Plus, if you’ve never signed up before, there is currently a 30-day FREE trial and you could watch the entire tournament in that time.Sign up to Amazon PrimeThe Prime Video app allows you to watch games on your TV, mobile, game console and more. Find out what devices you can watch Prime Video on here.Free-to-air Welsh language channel S4C also has live coverage of Wales v Georgia (kick-off 5.15pm). In Wales, you’ll find S4C on: Sky channel 104, Freeview 4, Virgin TV 166 and Freesat 104. In the rest of the UK, it’s Sky channel 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Wales v Georgia takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Wales v Georgia  live stream: How to watch from IrelandPremier Sports will show Wales v Georgia (kick-off 5.15pm) for Irish viewers.If you have a Sky contract, Premier Sports is part of the broadcaster’s ‘Sports Extra’ package, which costs €10 a month for the first six months and €20 a month after that for Sky Sports customers (€17 and €34 for non-Sky Sports customers).You can also access Premier Sports via a Now TV day or month pass, which allows you to watch sports channels without committing to a long-term contract.Get a Now TV Pass Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Autumn Nations Cup from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go. Wales v Georgia is on SuperSport’s Grandstand and Rugby channels (7.15pm).There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from AsiaPremier Sports has the rights to broadcast Autumn Nations Cup matches, like Wales v Georgia, in Asia and will show matches in 22 territories – Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.A weekly pass to Premier Sports Asia is $19.99 or you can take out a rolling six-month contract for $59.99.Premier Sports Asia subscription We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from GeorgiaThose in Georgia can watch the Lelos compete in the Autumn Nations Cup on Imedi TV. This match will kick off at 9.15pm Georgian time. Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, beIN Sports has the rights to show Autumn Nations Cup matches, with Wales v Georgia kicking off at 4.15am.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers so you could take advantage of that to watch some of these Autumn Nations Cup matches.Kayo Sports offer Wales v Georgia live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to the Autumn Nations Cup from the Land of the Long White Cloud, Sky Sport NZ have the rights. Wales v Georgia kicks off at 6.15am, with coverage on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Don’t miss the action from this fixture at Parc y Scarlets Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup match

first_img Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup matchAnd so the Autumn Nations Cup draws to a close. For Ireland and Scotland, a final showdown in Dublin lies ahead. You can see all the selection choices, quotes and key stats in our Ireland v Scotland preview.If you want to find a reliable live stream for Ireland v Scotland wherever you are, though, read on below.How to watch Ireland v Scotland from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Autumn Nations Cup coverage, like Ireland v Scotland, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Autumn Nations Cup live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, beIN Sports has the rights to show Autumn Nations Cup matches, with Ireland v Scotland kicking off at 1.15am on Sunday.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers so you could take advantage of that to watch some of these Autumn Nations Cup matches.Kayo Sports offer We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from the UKAmazon Prime Video are the main rights holders for the Autumn Nations Cup in the UK and will show Ireland v Scotland (kick-off 2.15pm) live.If you’re an Amazon Prime member, coverage is included in your package. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, it costs £7.99 a month and you can cancel at any time, so you could just sign up for the period of the Autumn Nations Cup. Plus, if you’ve never signed up before, there is currently a 30-day FREE trial and you could watch the entire tournament in that time.Sign up to Amazon PrimeThe Prime Video app allows you to watch games on your TV, mobile, game console and more. Find out what devices you can watch Prime Video on here.Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from IrelandIreland v Scotland (kick-off 2.15pm) will be broadcast live on free-to-air RTE 2 and RTE Player in Ireland.Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, FloSports have the exclusive rights to show every Autumn Nations Cup match live. You can stream Ireland v Scotland (kick-off 9.15am EST and 6.15am on the West coast) via FloSports or watch via the app.A FloRugby monthly subscription costs $29.99 and the annual subscription is $150, with both packages also giving you access to the entire FloSports network, which includes coverage of cycling,motorsport and American football. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS All the details you need to watch the final match in Dublin Sign up to FloRugby Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Autumn Nations Cup from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go. Ireland v Scotland is on SuperSport Action (KICK-OFF 4.15pm).There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from AsiaPremier Sports has the rights to broadcast Autumn Nations Cup matches, like Ireland v Scotland, in Asia and will show matches in 22 territories – Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.A weekly pass to Premier Sports Asia is $19.99 or you can take out a rolling six-month contract for $59.99.Premier Sports Asia subscription On the attack: Jacob Stockdale takes on Scotland (Getty Images) Ireland v Scotland live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to the Autumn Nations Cup from the Land of the Long White Cloud, Sky Sport NZ have the rights. Ireland v Scotland kicks off at 3.15am on Sunday, with coverage on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerlast_img read more

Lions No 8 Taulupe Faletau on playing in the moment

first_imgFor Faletau, that’s “so important” – players need to complement each other’s skill-sets. “If you have two jacklers or even three, then they’re all trying to do the same thing. Then somebody else is likely not doing something. You can’t all run around as three back-rowers doing the same thing, you’ll get in each other’s way.”Faletau has played South Africa eight times and only won three. He hasn’t faced them since 2017 but is full of respect for the balance their back row has. He says Duane Vermeulen, Pieter-Steph du Toit and Siya Kolisi all seem to have a chemistry, adding that this means any trio facing them needs to be harmonising with each other.And while some may not sing about Kolisi’s play, a watchful Faletau adds: “Clearly he’s the captain and has the leadership qualities but as a carrier he can be nightmarish – he’s such a powerful bloke and he’s actually got very good footwork.”There is something lovably old-fashioned about a thoroughly modern athlete who admits he gets caught up in just playing.Faletau carries into London Irish (Inpho)The throwback of all throwbacks comes when Faletau talks about cheat meals, though. Harking back to childhood days, he conjures the image of a park bench in Pontypool, with him gleefully nailing kebabs with Billy and Mako Vunipola.He explains: “When we were kids back in Wales, all the dads used to come around the house to drink kava (a traditional Pacific Island drink). It wasn’t the biggest of houses so there’s not much for us to do but wander outside. We’d end up outside the kebab shop.“We were just trying to be funny as cars were driving past and after our kebab we’d just wander the streets of Pontypool at night until all the dads finished drinking kava! There was a patch of grass by the house. That’s where we’d play a bit of rugby and annoy the neighbours hitting the cars with the ball. They’d come out and bloody hell, they’d go nuts!”Here’s to finding your happy place, playing with abandon.This feature first appeared in the June 2021 issue of Rugby World. Taulupe Faletau on the attack for Wales (Inpho) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Lions No 8 Taulupe Faletau on playing in the momentIT’S HARD to articulate, Taulupe Faletau says of the overarching goal in rugby. It’s nothing as self-serious as attaining zen – come on – but you’ll get it.“There is something I want to achieve,” says the British & Irish Lions back-row of his game. It may stem from having spent his fair share of time on the sidelines. “It is a personal thing. Is it achievable? What I’m trying to say is… It’s a feeling. When I’m in a game, when I’m feeling good, that’s what I want to get to.“Basically I want it to be there whenever I play. You’ll get it in bits and bobs throughout a game, which is fine, but what I want to get to is being in that place throughout a game.”If we are honest, the perfect game is unattainable. It’s how you do in the pursuit of it that defines greatness. According to feted back-row buddy Justin Tipuric, Faletau’s best attribute is his dizzying search for improvement (though asked if this extends to life off the park, Faletau laughs of DIY, “Bloody hell, it’s a good job my missus isn’t here or she’d be straight on saying, ‘This guy’s useless around the house!’”).Warming up with Bath (Getty Images)However, you can understand why in amongst the work you can catch feelings of belonging. And that sensation can be intoxicating.You don’t always have to be in the exact spot you want either, to find it. Lately Faletau showed his incredible Test pedigree for Wales but at times this season with Bath, he’s shifted from No 8 so that a bang-in-form Zach Mercer can anchor the scrum.“It’s bit different,” Faletau says of shifts to six or the bench. “Obviously you want to play in the position you always play or that you’re known for. We actually just had this conversation at training – you can’t complain, with Zach’s form. You can’t ask to play there when someone is going so well.“So I’ve fitted in and it took me a couple of games to slot in there but I feel like me and him, as a combination at six and eight, has gone well. He has been on fire, as everybody can see now.”Here you come to realise that Faletau likes aiming the spotlight at others he feels are deserving. He doesn’t want a fuss.Take the example of Gareth Bale, his brother-in-law. These are two of Wales’ premier athletes but the back-rower assumes the footballer gets asked loads of questions, so doesn’t want to hassle him. Then there’s public speaking: he is a leader who can talk his way around the park, but the bells and whistles are a bit much. “Speaking in front of a group of people is probably my worst nightmare,” he says. An unburdened Faletau is the most dangerous version.Which leads interestingly to talk of balance. They’re looking for it in the back row at Bath, and appear to have found it in Wales. So as everyone plays Fantasy Rugby with their own Lions XVs, will we pay enough heed to the need for balance?center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Bath, Wales and Lions back-rower on balance, Boks and kebabslast_img read more