Can Croatian tourism last 365 days a year?

first_imgThis is a question that is often asked, and these days it is being brought up again by local and regional experts who are gathering towards the end of the summer season on this very topic. I am not an expert, but I seem to know the answer to this question, because I live in a Croatian city where tourism lasts almost 365 days a year, and I travel often to our capital Croatian city where tourism lasts for a full 365 days and which confirms that it is very possible and that it already is. Along the way, I am an islander who moved from the island to the mainland in the city. And by the way, I am also a small landlord who still has a property on the island that he rents out to tourists, not 365 but for about 65 days. So, although I am not an expert, I know that tourism in Croatia can last 365 days in some destinations, and in some it obviously cannot.So my unprofessional opinion is that the real question to ask should be: Why can’t tourism last 365 days a year in the whole of Croatia? If I put my house on the island in a big car, put it on a ferry, and put it somewhere in the city where I live, it would be at least 265 days full, not 65 like now. Same house. And it is in vain that I have the status of “SUPER HOST” on the island or that I have a “SUPER HOUSE”. In vain. You don’t really need to be an expert at all to understand that it’s not a matter of the host or home but of the destination. An island, or hinterland, or any inland part of Croatia that we call “rural”,  there is no tourism 365 days a year because there is no content. There is NOTHING that would attract people to stay there after those 65 sunny and warm days in the island case. In fact, it’s not that there is no content, there is, but NO ONE has put it into function and offered it in a more serious and organized way. And it’s not that easy. NOT. There is a lot of work to be done here. Lots and lots. Croatia (and the countries before it) failed to keep the local population in many of our destinations, and especially on the islands, 365 days a year. She didn’t know how to design the contents for those who were born there. Make life meaningful. There is no more lavender on my island, and we called it “lavender island”. There is less and less wine, and it is called “the island of wine – from 384 BC”. And what is most important and saddest: there are fewer and fewer people. There are fewer and fewer people! And that is a fact.Without people the destination is just the sea or the snow, or already something that God gives. And as soon as the snow drifts or the sea cools, the guests disappear. The meaning of their being there disappears. The only meaning that has been helplessly offered so far has been low prices in the pre-season and sub-season. It is clear to everyone that this did not help much. However, one should not point the finger at “Croatia” too much, because the scattering of rural areas and the settlement of cities is a world trend and one should be aware of that. The facilities are in the cities, no matter how much they kept quiet about it. And there is nothing wrong with that. There is no season in London, nor Paris, nor Rome, because there is always a lot. All 365 days. New York even “never sleeps.” But it is certain that even in these highly developed countries there are seasons in some smaller towns and in rural areas where not everything is always full. Our Zagreb is a bright Croatian example of year-round tourism in which the term “season” has also completely disappeared.  So let the tourism in the cities 365 days. It’s all Croatian tourism. And you need to invest in that. There is also a lot of room for improvement. And rural areas will need a lot of experts for more serious changes. And a lot of work. After all, isn’t there a difference between a destination in the center and one in the suburbs, ie in the “rural” part of the city, even within a large city? The restaurant in the suburbs certainly needs more effort than the one in the central square. Something more needs to be offered to attract customers. Something more.It might not be a bad idea to include a little less professional ones, and even non-professional ones. Those that can create the basis for content that experts would design. If they are more there when the experts arrive.Author: Miki Bratanićlast_img read more

Continuation of passenger growth and announcement of new routes in the summer flight schedule at Franjo Tuđman Airport

first_imgSource: Dr. Franjo Tuđman AirportPhoto: Facebook Dr. Franjo Tuđman Airport Domestic airline Croatia Airlines announced the introduction of flights to two new destinations, Sofia and Podgorica. Both destinations will be available through three flights a week starting in May. From June, Zagreb and Kiev will be connected by a direct flight of Windrose Airlines three times a week. In addition to opening new destinations, additional flights are being introduced to many existing destinations, and so on Air France from May it introduces the second daily flight on the route Zagreb-Paris. Together with the daily flight of Croatia Airlines, Zagreb and Paris will be connected by three routes a day. British Airways adds another four weeks of flights from London (ZL Heathrow) to Zagreb which will ultimately be a total of 11 flights per week. Croatia Airlines will also increase seat capacity on flights to Brussels, Skopje and Copenhagen by using more A319 aircraft instead of the current CRJ1000 aircraft. In addition to these scheduled flights, negotiations are underway with two new carriers from Africa and Asia for charter routes during the summer flight schedule in 2020. The situation with the coronavirus has a certain negative impact on traffic in Zagreb, so at the Franjo Tuđman Airport they monitor the situation and are in regular contact with all companies, following their update of the flight schedule on some direct flights to Zagreb.center_img Croatia Airlines is adding another weekly flight from Amsterdam, which will offer passengers a total of 8 flights a week from Zagreb to Amsterdam. Air Serbia adds two more weeks of flights from Belgrade, which is a total of 13 flights a week on the route Belgrade – Zagreb. Aegean changes the type of aircraft and will fly an Airbus A400 aircraft instead of a Q319 (turboprop) aircraft in the summer flight schedule, and will double the seat capacity on the route to Athens. Franjo Tuđman Airport marks a positive start in 2020. Passenger growth of 6,2% was recorded in January, while February brought growth of 2%, despite the impact on traffic related to coronavirus. In this year’s summer flight schedule, flights to three new destinations and a dozen additional flights to existing destinations have been announced.last_img read more

Why are city police ignoring homeless?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion My wife and I were homeless for many years, but not homeless, as several individuals who pan handle across from the Schenectady Community College claim to be. We were homeless because we had the good fortune to work for as many as three employers, each 24/7, raise two children and pay the mortgage. A day off was rare.I’m perplexed as to why the police do not bother them. Do they have a permit? If they have a permit, please tell me where to apply. I can fit several hours a day to supplement my retirement pay. Thank for your support.Jim KownackScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…last_img read more

State should rethink its new testing rules

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI read with interest the Jan. 23 article about new accountability rules for New York’s schools. Having taught for over 30 years in this state, I’m used to seeing regulations come and go. Some ideas have clear and appropriate goals. Others seem to have been created on the fly.Particularly difficult for me to swallow in the new batch of rules is the directive about districts being held accountable for student participation in state tests. This strikes me as lacking any clear thought and being another case of the state passing the buck to districts, as it so often does.The opt-out movement is an example of democracy at its best. An important constituency (parents) realized that something was wrong and took action.There’s a complete lack of logic in holding districts accountable for increasing participation rates. How on Earth can they be expected to do this when there is a concerted effort to the contrary by parents? The state obviously has no answer, so it just kicked the can. Why would the state try to quash a well-organized and thoughtful act of resistance? We try to teach students to be active participants in our democracy. When we try to suppress actions, we are sending a contradictory message.The state Department of Education would do well to include all stakeholders in a comprehensive and inclusive discussion of what is really wrong with testing in the state. Forcing districts to be bullies is not the answer.Martha MeskutoveczGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Assault gun ban would protect us

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I’m a sportsman. Growing up, our primary forms of recreation were fishing and hunting. I have fond memories of days spent with my father hunting those erratic woodcock with a 20-gauge pump shotgun. To my thinking, that’s the epitome of shooting sports. I can imagine no sport that requires an assault rifle. There’s no room in the shooting sports for such a weapon.I agree with those who argue that it’s not guns that kill people, but people who kill people. However, people with assault weapons kill exponentially more people than people with ordinary firearms. We may not be able to eradicate all senseless mayhem, but we can reduce the carnage.I’m also sympathetic to those who vigorously argue for their Second Amendment rights. I have spent my entire professional career defending the constitutional rights of citizens. The framers of our Constitution intentionally gave us a document that protects us against government abuse as well as allows for change to meet circumstances that the framers couldn’t foresee.The pressing need of our day isn’t for law-abiding citizens to protect themselves from their government by force of arms, but to protect each other, and especially our children, from madmen with weapons of mass slaughter. We must take steps to ban the general availability of assault weapons.Michael T. HoranSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineSchenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashlast_img read more

Niche market

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The riled west

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Bath regeneration: A little local difficulty

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Burbage quits LSH

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Going places

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